Vatican Astronomer: Don’t Use Science to `Prove God Did Something’

c. 2005 Religion News Service SYRACUSE, N.Y. _ From Brother Guy J. Consolmagno’s perspective, the latest chapter in the evolution vs. creationism debate focuses on the wrong question. “The idea of insisting God did something misses the whole glory of the universe,” the Vatican astronomer said in an interview. Consolmagno recently discussed the connections between science and religion at Le Moyne College here.

Judge Will `Rule as I See Fit’ in Closely Watched Intelligent Design Case

c. 2005 Religion News Service HARRISBURG, Pa. _ Both sides of a federal trial on intelligent design expect that Judge John E. Jones III will rule on whether the school board in Dover, Pa., violated the First Amendment when it adopted a policy on intelligent design. But beyond that, all bets are off. The Discovery Institute, a Seattle-based proponent of intelligent design, wants the judge to limit his ruling to the school board’s actions.

Judge Will `Rule as I See Fit’ in Closely Watched Intelligent Design Case

c. 2005 Religion News Service HARRISBURG, Pa. _ Both sides of a federal trial on intelligent design expect that Judge John E. Jones III will rule on whether the school board in Dover, Pa., violated the First Amendment when it adopted a policy on intelligent design. But beyond that, all bets are off. The Discovery Institute, a Seattle-based proponent of intelligent design, wants the judge to limit his ruling to the school board’s actions.

How a Bible-Carrying Anglican Theorized Evolution, and Lost His Faith

c. 2005 Religion News Service (UNDATED) More than a century before today’s proponents of intelligent design theory began arguing that life is too complex to arise through the natural process of evolution _ an argument that has produced the latest clash in America’s culture wars _ Charles Darwin, evolution’s main man, was causing trouble. He didn’t set out to upset people. He was, after all, a strict creationist himself, on his way toward becoming an Anglican clergyman, when he embarked at age 22 on the odyssey of naturalistic observations that would provide the grist for his revelation. His inscribed Bible was among the few belongings he brought along for his seminal journey aboard the H.M.S. Beagle.

How a Bible-Carrying Anglican Theorized Evolution, and Lost His Faith

c. 2005 Religion News Service (UNDATED) More than a century before today’s proponents of intelligent design theory began arguing that life is too complex to arise through the natural process of evolution _ an argument that has produced the latest clash in America’s culture wars _ Charles Darwin, evolution’s main man, was causing trouble. He didn’t set out to upset people. He was, after all, a strict creationist himself, on his way toward becoming an Anglican clergyman, when he embarked at age 22 on the odyssey of naturalistic observations that would provide the grist for his revelation. His inscribed Bible was among the few belongings he brought along for his seminal journey aboard the H.M.S. Beagle.

Intelligent Design Trial Puts Big Spotlight on Small Town

c. 2005 Religion News Service DOVER, Pa. _ Todd Gentzler was sitting on the small wooden porch of the venerable brick house he bought a few months ago on Main Street, cleaning heating baseboards he had removed from inside, when he was greeted by a reporter from the BBC. Media from across the country had converged on the town since the local school board introduced intelligent design in its ninth-grade biology classes in January, rekindling a national debate over evolution and creationism and pitching Dover into a landmark court battle over the constitutional separation of church and state. The New York Times had come.

Intelligent Design Trial Puts Big Spotlight on Small Town

c. 2005 Religion News Service DOVER, Pa. _ Todd Gentzler was sitting on the small wooden porch of the venerable brick house he bought a few months ago on Main Street, cleaning heating baseboards he had removed from inside, when he was greeted by a reporter from the BBC. Media from across the country had converged on the town since the local school board introduced intelligent design in its ninth-grade biology classes in January, rekindling a national debate over evolution and creationism and pitching Dover into a landmark court battle over the constitutional separation of church and state. The New York Times had come.

Discovery Institute’s `Wedge’ Document Described 20-Year Strategy

c. 2005 Religion News Service (UNDATED) According to a six-year-old “wedge document,” The Discovery Institute, a leading proponent of intelligent design, “seeks nothing less than the overthrow of materialism and its cultural legacies.” The document described a five-year goal of making intelligent design “an accepted alternative in the sciences” and a 20-year objective of making “intelligent design theory … the dominant perspective in science.” Leaked to the Internet in 1999, the document served as a basis for a book by Barbara Forrest, professor of philosophy at Southeastern Louisiana University. The Discovery Institute’s Center for Renewal of Science and Culture, based in Seattle, calls the document “an early fundraising proposal” that has become “a giant urban legend.” Forrest was a key witness for the plaintiffs in their lawsuit against the Dover Area School District’s policy of requiring that a statement on intelligent design be read to ninth-grade science students. Eleven parents in the Pennsylvania district sued the school board, and a trial was held in Harrisburg, Pa.

Discovery Institute’s `Wedge’ Document Described 20-Year Strategy

c. 2005 Religion News Service (UNDATED) According to a six-year-old “wedge document,” The Discovery Institute, a leading proponent of intelligent design, “seeks nothing less than the overthrow of materialism and its cultural legacies.” The document described a five-year goal of making intelligent design “an accepted alternative in the sciences” and a 20-year objective of making “intelligent design theory … the dominant perspective in science.” Leaked to the Internet in 1999, the document served as a basis for a book by Barbara Forrest, professor of philosophy at Southeastern Louisiana University. The Discovery Institute’s Center for Renewal of Science and Culture, based in Seattle, calls the document “an early fundraising proposal” that has become “a giant urban legend.” Forrest was a key witness for the plaintiffs in their lawsuit against the Dover Area School District’s policy of requiring that a statement on intelligent design be read to ninth-grade science students. Eleven parents in the Pennsylvania district sued the school board, and a trial was held in Harrisburg, Pa.

Vatican Gives Mixed Messages on Evolution, Intelligent Design

c. 2005 Religion News Service VATICAN CITY _ Ever since the Roman inquisition condemned Galileo for observing that the Earth revolved around the sun, the Vatican has held back from making sweeping challenges to scientific thought for fear of overstepping its bounds. So it’s understandable that Pope Benedict XVI raised eyebrows when he recently described the universe as an “intelligent project that is the cosmos.” Not only did he echo the language of the intelligent design movement, he also waded into a controversy that has blurred the boundaries between faith and science in the United States and beyond. The debate echoing through Vatican corridors these days, however, is whether the pope has given the Catholic Church’s tacit support to intelligent design advocates and their ongoing campaign to debunk Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution. “These allusions are fine, but I hope the pope doesn’t take a stand,” the Rev. George Coyne, director of the Vatican Observatory, said in an interview.

Vatican Gives Mixed Messages on Evolution, Intelligent Design

c. 2005 Religion News Service VATICAN CITY _ Ever since the Roman inquisition condemned Galileo for observing that the Earth revolved around the sun, the Vatican has held back from making sweeping challenges to scientific thought for fear of overstepping its bounds. So it’s understandable that Pope Benedict XVI raised eyebrows when he recently described the universe as an “intelligent project that is the cosmos.” Not only did he echo the language of the intelligent design movement, he also waded into a controversy that has blurred the boundaries between faith and science in the United States and beyond. The debate echoing through Vatican corridors these days, however, is whether the pope has given the Catholic Church’s tacit support to intelligent design advocates and their ongoing campaign to debunk Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution. “These allusions are fine, but I hope the pope doesn’t take a stand,” the Rev. George Coyne, director of the Vatican Observatory, said in an interview.

RNS Daily Digest

c. 2005 Religion News Service Catholics to Mark 25th Anniversary of Churchwomen’s Murders in El Salvador (UNDATED) Roman Catholics from across the Americas are preparing to mark the 25th anniversary of the murder of four U.S. churchwomen in El Salvador, an event that activists say still resonates across Central America. Maryknoll Sisters Maura Clarke and Ita Ford, Ursuline Sister Dorothy Kazel and lay missionary Jean Donovan were tortured, raped and murdered by Salvadoran National Guardsmen after leaving the San Salvador airport on Dec. 2, 1980. The women’s murders _ part of a mosaic of brutality by Salvadoran death squads that also included the killing of Archbishop Oscar Romero of San Salvador on March 24, 1980 _ prompted an outcry in the United States.

RNS Daily Digest

c. 2005 Religion News Service Catholics to Mark 25th Anniversary of Churchwomen’s Murders in El Salvador (UNDATED) Roman Catholics from across the Americas are preparing to mark the 25th anniversary of the murder of four U.S. churchwomen in El Salvador, an event that activists say still resonates across Central America. Maryknoll Sisters Maura Clarke and Ita Ford, Ursuline Sister Dorothy Kazel and lay missionary Jean Donovan were tortured, raped and murdered by Salvadoran National Guardsmen after leaving the San Salvador airport on Dec. 2, 1980. The women’s murders _ part of a mosaic of brutality by Salvadoran death squads that also included the killing of Archbishop Oscar Romero of San Salvador on March 24, 1980 _ prompted an outcry in the United States.

RNS Daily Digest

c. 2005 Religion News Service Catholics to Mark 25th Anniversary of Churchwomen’s Murders in El Salvador (UNDATED) Roman Catholics from across the Americas are preparing to mark the 25th anniversary of the murder of four U.S. churchwomen in El Salvador, an event that activists say still resonates across Central America. Maryknoll Sisters Maura Clarke and Ita Ford, Ursuline Sister Dorothy Kazel and lay missionary Jean Donovan were tortured, raped and murdered by Salvadoran National Guardsmen after leaving the San Salvador airport on Dec. 2, 1980. The women’s murders _ part of a mosaic of brutality by Salvadoran death squads that also included the killing of Archbishop Oscar Romero of San Salvador on March 24, 1980 _ prompted an outcry in the United States.

RELIGION BEST-SELLERS

(Editor’s note: This November list is compiled by Publishers Weekly magazine from data received from general independent bookstores, chain stores and wholesalers within the month of October. Copyright 2005 Publishers Weekly. Distributed by Religion News Service.) HARDCOVER 1. Your Best Life Now, by Joel Osteen. (Warner Faith, $19.95) 2.