Why “Wolf of Wall Street” is a profoundly moral film

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Leonardo DiCaprio stars as Jordan Belfort in "The Wolf of Wall Street" - Photo courtesy Goksan Ozman via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1f8DMGz)

Leonardo DiCaprio stars as Jordan Belfort in "The Wolf of Wall Street" - Photo courtesy Goksan Ozman via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1f8DMGz)

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It set the record for most uses of the ‘F’ word in any film (506, if you’re counting). There are more drugs than you could shake a stick at, and with the drugs come sex–lots and lots of sex. In one particular moment of triumph (spoiler alert), Jordan Belfort’s (Leonardo DiCaprio’s) wife opens a limousine door […]

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  • Bill

    On the one hand you say that Belfort’s activities “should be objectionable to any viewer” and then you observe “the amount of laughter at his antics I heard in the theater made me think plenty of people saw him as a sort of twisted hero”

    I don’t think films need to further normalize a culture of dissolution in order to teach us a lesson. As you observed, the lesson is lost on an awful lot of people watching the film.

    I’ve learned the lesson and so will avoid the film.

  • Sheryl

    Are you serious – a profoundly moral movie? I totally disagree with your assessment. I watched the movie for approximately one hour before I couldn’t take it any longer and walked out. I considered staying longer, hoping there would be some redeeming value to the movie; but by that point, I didn’t care if there was. I had seen way too much. Doesn’t it say in the Bible that we need to be careful of what we see and listen to? To guard our hearts? It was my own ignorance going to see this movie without researching first what I was going to see. I won’t make that mistake again. I don’t feel Martin Scorcese needed to use such graphic details of all the drugs, sex, nudity, and violence in order to get his point across. Have we sunk so low in our society that this is considered entertainment? As stated on movieguide.org, this movie is “orgiastic excess”. Guard your hearts and do not see this movie!!!!!

  • Rob Bear

    I wonder to what extent this portrays the life of the so-called 1%?

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  • Ben Sona

    You walked out of the movie and yet you pass judgement? You missed the entire second and third acts when Belfort loses everything including his soul. The final shot is haunting and challenges the audience.
    You reaction is exactly what’s wrong with America. We don’t want honesty in film. We want sugar coated fantasies that every person will redeem himself. We don’t want to believe that everyone one of us could be seduced by power, but we can.
    Honesty is morality. Maybe the Wolf is one of the moral films you could watch.

  • Here’s a question: Why do we need to roll in the mud to see the dirt? No one needs to watch filth in order to see a so-called moral message. Calling this movie a “profoundly moral film” is the quintessential example of perfuming the pig. It’s as sensible as saying we should spend a million bucks to go mining for a ounce of gold. To accept this film as an altruistic moral lesson against greed and corruption, requires us to ignore the very real fact that it, too, is a filth for profit capitalistic venture.

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  • Aaron Ladd

    Ease Your Conscience By Finding The Gospel Theme™ In Any Filthy Movie.

    http://babylonbee.com/news/ease-your-conscience-by-finding-the-gospel-theme-in-any-filthy-movie/