Ethicists criticize treatment of brain-dead patients

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Mechanical ventilation equipment in a hospital.

Photo courtesy of Pornsak Paewlumfaek via Shutterstock

Mechanical ventilation equipment in a hospital.

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(RNS) Many doctors are questioning continued medical procedures on a 13-year-old girl declared brain-dead nearly a month ago, calling interventions to provide nutrition to a dead body wrong and unethical.

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  • Earold Gunter

    This is sad, just sad. My mother had a routine procedure on her heart that resulted in her brain death almost two weeks after it went terribly wrong. The doctor told my family we had a difficult decision to make. After they told us that she had been given an EEG, which showed her as having no brain activity, and explaining this had been verified with three more EEG’s, we didn’t feel their was a decision left to make, she was already dead.
    I hope these families can find peace in their lives after what is inevitable comes to pass.

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  • Atheist Max

    So sorry to hear the story about your mother. I also had a similar thing happen with a cousin. You did the humane thing, the right thing.

    Religion often meddles where it is nobody’s business. These are private, difficult matters for families.

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  • marilyn

    How about a VA hospital that gave the family a choice of removing life support from a person that was conscious and aware. Needed breathing assistance and was tube fed.( I had no say because we were divorced.) It was a majority rules decision as he had kids from a previous marriage and one living parent. My daughter and one step son were the only ones who seemed to want to hold out hope. I don’t think that is ethical either.