Sexy swingers club or ‘church’: Who gets to decide?

Print More
United Fellowship Center in suburban Madison, Tenn., is a planned "church" that will house what used to be called the Social Club, a whispered-about swingers club. Religion News Service photo by Heidi Hall

United Fellowship Center in suburban Madison, Tenn., is a planned "church" that will house what used to be called the Social Club, a whispered-about swingers club. Religion News Service photo by Heidi Hall

Active RNS subscribers and members can view this content by logging-in here.

MADISON, Tenn. (RNS) Rooms labeled as dungeons in remodeling plans for The Social Club have been renamed as "choir" and "handbell" space in the revamped United Fellowship Center. Courts may decide the sincerity of that conversion.

  • Finally.
    A church for me.

  • Pingback: Sexy swingers club or ‘church': Who gets to decide? - by Ronald Gronowski - Rev Ron Gronowski - The Reverend()

  • Let the wheat and the tares grow together. By their fruits they will be known.

  • Fran

    Yes, the world has gone mad, according to Bible prophecies (Matthew 24; Mark 13; Luke 21; 2 Timothy 3:1-5) concerning the last days of this wicked era!

  • dmj76

    Max

    I know several atheist couples. It looks to me that they are faithful to each other, and love one another as much as religious people. (Actually, if you think that death will separate you forever from someone, maybe you pay closer attention to them when they are near.)

    Fidelity in marriage has nothing to do with religion, it is about what kind of relationship people have.

    best wishes

  • Michael Glass

    Maybe the answer to this conundrum is to stop trying to distinguish between religious and non-religious organisations, and treat all these organisations the same.

    They all should be subject to the same laws, be taxed the same, have the same privileges and responsibilities, follow the same planning rules and be bound by the same restrictions.

    That might sort out the problem of deciding between religious organisations and frauds.

  • James Carr

    Could there be a more laughable, degenerate idea than this ? Not even worthy of discussion, comment, or sarcasm.

  • Yup.
    I’ve been married for 28 years. But we’ve been together for 31 years.
    We have both been Atheists for a while.

  • Larry

    Yes there could be.

    Corporate religious beliefs is a far more degenerate and disgusting idea.

    The notion that a for profit business entity has strong personal beliefs is a perversion that far exceeds whatever goes on in that swingers club. At least the club isn’t trying to use status as an alleged church to duck out of paying its share of taxes. Same can’t be said of various commercial ventures and holding companies claiming to be religious organizations.

    The idea that an entity which exists as state government filings designed to separate business assets and responsibilities from the personal lives of its owners can exert rights associated with live breathing people. An abuse of the very concept of religious beliefs.

    The swingers club is being creative, but they are small fries compared to the full blown perversion of religion seen by churches which act like multinationals.

  • Diogenes

    Without reference to personal point of view, I’d like to neutrally question (based on the framework of most of your comments regarding the Law) whether or not in fact, you are a lawyer by profession. When your posts are evenly toned, I’ve not read anyone on this site who sounds more like one. No disrespect to the profession, but I find lawyers as problematic as you would be apt to find preachers.

  • Pingback: Rainbow jihad * Sex church * iSwap: April’s Religious Freedom Recap - On Freedom()

  • Larry

    This is a semi-anonymous online discussion. Certain things get left at the door, when I post here. I am not going to answer that question. There are some very personal and practical reasons not to do so that I will not go into detail about.

    The only time I have ever to appealed to authority of personal professional knowledge had to do with insurance related issues. Long before my current profession, I admitted on this site that I worked for a property/casualty insurance company in some capacity.

  • Charlie Sitzes

    “In the Bible Belt, we’re not equipped to deal with something like this. It’s very painful, very hurtful, and we’re praying about it.”

    Yep. Pray all that sin away. Works every time.

    We will be having our National Day of Prayer in a few days. That will, finally, do away with war, famine, disease and out of wedlock births.

    Personally, knowing how much good prayer does, I think we should have the National Day of Prayer on January 1st each year. Why wait till May?

  • Barry the Baptist

    This is great. Best of luck to them. This is a group that will spend more time being religious than any other church in the region:

    “Oh god, oh god, oh Jesus, oh GOOOOOOOOD!”

    HAHAHAHA!

  • Diogenes

    Fair enough. Well spoken.

  • “National Prayer Day…”

    Children make wishes. Grown ups apply their minds.
    It is a debasement of our intelligence and our humanity to have a ‘national prayer day’.

    Prayer is not going to accomplish anything.
    Think about it – If prayer actually worked, there would be no need for prayers because everyone would just have everything they already prayed for.

    The act of prayer is anti-human, anti-intellectual, anti-thought.
    Meditation, self-reflection and mindfulness is what people need.
    Not childish “prayers”.

  • Charles,

    in other words, I agree with you completely.

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Orgy Anyone?()

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Keep Pure()

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Adult Fun Time()

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Hotness Happens()

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Samson The Square()

  • Albert Hanson

    Any group can claim that they’re a church. Whether or not it’s legitimate begs to differ. More than once I’ve been tempted to open the Church of Moolah. It may be attractive to the rich because the primary purpose is the worship of the almighty dollar.

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | The Price Is Right()

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Fling Finder()

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Boolzi()

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Byte Active Awareness()

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Ayesulartey()

  • Dominant Gent

    “In the Bible Belt, we’re not equipped to deal with something like this. It’s very painful, very hurtful, and we’re praying about it.”
    Yeah! Praying about it? That’ll work!

  • shawnie5

    I agree that lawyers can be problematic. But let me assure you, Larry is NOT a lawyer.

  • Pingback: Osibogun and Partners - Law Firm()

  • Pingback: Is the Decline in Christianity Overstated in the Pew Survey? « CauseHub()

  • Pingback: This Is Why Accountability Trumps Religion | Casual Sexual Women()