British Jews object to ultra-Orthodox sect’s decree banning women from driving

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Ultra-Orthodox Jews watch the wedding ceremony of Esther Rokeach and Avraham Safrin (not pictured) in Jerusalem on June 10, 2014. Thousands gathered to celebrate the wedding of Safrin and Rokeach, the granddaughter of the spiritual leader of the Belz Hasidim, which is one of the largest Hasidic movements in the world. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Baz Ratner
 *Editors: This photo may be republished with RNS-BELZ-DRIVE, originally transmitted on June 1, 2015.*Editors: This photo may be republished with RNS-BELZ-DRIVE, originally transmitted on June 1, 2015.

Ultra-Orthodox Jews watch the wedding ceremony of Esther Rokeach and Avraham Safrin (not pictured) in Jerusalem on June 10, 2014. Thousands gathered to celebrate the wedding of Safrin and Rokeach, the granddaughter of the spiritual leader of the Belz Hasidim, which is one of the largest Hasidic movements in the world. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Baz Ratner
*Editors: This photo may be republished with RNS-BELZ-DRIVE, originally transmitted on June 1, 2015.*Editors: This photo may be republished with RNS-BELZ-DRIVE, originally transmitted on June 1, 2015.

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(RNS) Education Secretary Nicky Morgan described the decree as “completely unacceptable in modern Britain.” But pushback has also come from the larger Jewish community.