July 6, 2015

Confederate battle flag embattled in S.C. legislature as removal debate begins

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A Confederate flag flies at the base of a Confederate memorial in front of the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia on July 4, 2015.  Photo by Tami Chappell, courtesy of Reuters
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-GAY-OPED, originally transmitted on June 8, 2016.

A Confederate flag flies at the base of a Confederate memorial in front of the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia on July 4, 2015. Photo by Tami Chappell, courtesy of Reuters *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-GAY-OPED, originally transmitted on June 8, 2016.

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It could take three days of votes before it's decided whether the lawmakers will heed the governor's call to remove the flag from Statehouse grounds.

  • Jack

    The right reason to take down the flag is that it offends and hurts a lot of fellow human beings, while contributing little to “southern pride” since most southerners feel pride about the Stars and Stripes alone. But like everything else, the loony left has a knack for taking good ideas to maniacal extremes, such as brain-dead proposals to remove Confederate flags at Gettysburg, where the context is a simple telling of history of the battle between the two sides.

  • Scott Shaver

    Jack:

    Once you start down the slippery slope of Marxism, for any reason, the loonies become the norm.

    If you want to approach this from your the perspective of your own philosophical views about why the confederate flag or any historically significant image needs to be taken down, you have the right to do so.

    But you, me nor anybody else was born with an inherent right “not to be offended.”

    Don’t find the right not to be offended emphasized anywhere in Scripture for that matter.

  • Jack

    What I’m talking about is not a “right not to be offended.”

    It’s what, before our time, used to be called “charity.”

    It’s not a right that someone can demand, but it is a grace that should be extended to fellow human beings.

    And to the extent that a state capital represents the people of that state, it is reasonable for elected officials to try their best not to offend “charity” by their actions. It is noble and good for people to put other people ahead of their own wants and desires.