Most Americans don’t see sin in divorce

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Musicians Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert arrive at the 48th Country Music Association Awards in Nashville, Tennessee on November 5, 2014. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Eric Henderson
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-DIVORCE-SIN, originally transmitted on August 12, 2015.

Musicians Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert arrive at the 48th Country Music Association Awards in Nashville, Tennessee on November 5, 2014. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Eric Henderson *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-DIVORCE-SIN, originally transmitted on August 12, 2015.

The characters of Kermit and Miss Piggy arrive at the premiere of "Muppets Most Wanted" at El Capitan theatre in Hollywood, California on March 11, 2014. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-DIVORCE-SIN, originally transmitted on August 12, 2015.

Kermit and Miss Piggy arrive at the premiere of “Muppets Most Wanted” at El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood on March 11, 2014. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-DIVORCE-SIN, originally transmitted on August 12, 2015.

(RNS) In a summer of celebrity splits — Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert, Jennifer Garner and Ben Affleck, Miss Piggy and Kermit — a question comes up for many Christians.

Is it a sin — cohabitating Muppets aside — to break up a marriage?

If you’ve got a good reason for divorce — adultery, abuse, addiction or abandonment — fewer than 1 in 4 Americans would call that a sin, a new LifeWay Research survey finds.

The survey of 1,000 U.S. adults finds only a minority would call divorce a sin even when:

  • There’s adultery (39 percent).
  • The two people no longer love each other (38 percent).
  • One spouse has abandoned the other (38 percent).
  • One spouse is abusing the other (37 percent).
  • A spouse is addicted to pornography (35 percent).

However, 37 percent say divorce is not a sin in any of those circumstances.

Musicians Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert arrive at the 48th Country Music Association Awards in Nashville, Tennessee on November 5, 2014. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Eric Henderson *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-DIVORCE-SIN, originally transmitted on August 12, 2015.

Musicians Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert arrive at the 48th Country Music Association Awards in Nashville, Tenn., on Nov. 5, 2014. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Eric Henderson
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-DIVORCE-SIN, originally transmitted on Aug. 12, 2015.

People who identify as Christians were slightly more likely to see sin in those divorcing over abuse (43 percent) or abandonment (43 percent) or pornography addiction (39 percent).

And more than 4 in 10 Protestants (43 percent) think it’s sinful for couples to split over a lack of love, according to the survey, which has an overall margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.


READ: Do polls reveal the God’s honest truth about American religion? No, but they still count


“Hopefully, they are basing their view of what is sin by what the Bible says,” said Scott McConnell, vice president of LifeWay Research.

“Clearly in Scripture, God indicates that he doesn’t like divorce. But Jesus did have things to say about this.”

In Matthew 19:6, Jesus tells the Pharisees: “What God has joined together, man must not separate.” However, Jesus adds an exception in verse 8 — “sexual immorality.”

A second survey, of 1,000 Protestant pastors, found that 61 percent saw sin in couples giving up a loveless marriage.


READ: Pope Francis says church must welcome divorced, remarried Catholics


Actor Ben Affleck holds his wife, actress Jennifer Garner's hand as they arrive at the 2014 Vanity Fair Oscars Party in West Hollywood, Calif., on March 2, 2014. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Danny Moloshok  *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-DIVORCE-SIN, originally transmitted on August 12, 2015.

Actor Ben Affleck holds the hand of his wife, actress Jennifer Garner, as they arrive at the 2014 Vanity Fair Oscars Party in West Hollywood, Calif., on March 2, 2014. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-DIVORCE-SIN, originally transmitted on Aug. 12, 2015.

The surveys of all Americans and of pastors were conducted in September 2014, when celebs Lambert and Shelton, Garner and Affleck and the Muppet couple, about to star in a new TV show, were all presumably still together.

Last week, Miss Piggy squealed about her breakup on Facebook in a perfect parody of celebrity split announcements:

“After careful thought, thoughtful consideration and considerable squabbling, Kermit the Frog and moi have made the difficult decision to terminate our romantic relationship. Our personal lives are now distinct and separate, and we will be seeing other people, pigs, frogs, et al. This is our only comment on this private matter … unless we get the right offer.”

It would appear they no longer love each other. No sin in that, many would say.

LM/MG END GROSSMAN

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  • Sam

    Quelle surprise. Religion yet again changes what it says is moral to suit popular demand.

  • Be Brave

    Sam,

    Kind of sounds exactly like the reports of how people behave written about in the Bible.

    Hmmmmm

  • Bernardo

    Breaking contracts, lies and cheating are will forever be sins !!!

  • Jack

    Compared to people in other western countries, Americans divorce at the drop of a hat, but the divorce rate has leveled off over time.

  • Dominic

    Divorce itself is not the sin, if divorce is the only answer to a destructive marriage. Repeated divorces (Hollywood) show a grave indifference to the marriage vows, making marriage a mockery. The laws should be more stringent for those marrying, for if you are truly in love the wait will be worth it. Divorce is the act that causes hate, disrupted children, and financial ruin. But, as in the case of abortion, whatever is in our way is dispensable.

  • Sam

    “Kind of sounds exactly”? Say woot?

  • Greg1

    Yes, Dominic is correct. Jesus said, “whoever divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality, and marries another, commits adultery.”[a] Matthew 19:8. It is the marrying “another” that is the sin.

  • Ben in oakland

    Well, Greg, I guess Jesus just didn’t mean it when he said “what God gphas joined together let no man divide.” It sounds to me like he is saying that if you get divorced, youre defying God. It also says the same thing in the book of Malachi: God hates divorce. Or is that another one of those biblical things that Christians think no longer applies, except to other people?

  • Ben in oakland

    Wows a, Dominic. I don’t see that bit of knowledge anywhere in the Bible. It says clearly in the book of Molokai that God hates divorce. Jesus said clearly that what God has joined together, no man should divide.

    One would almost think that you’re just making it up as you go along.

  • Ben in oakland

    Funny, Jack. Of all my gay couple friends and acquaintances— And that would be about 50 of them — only one couple has ever filed for divorce. And funny thing, they were the model, ideal, perfect couple. Assuming that was any kind of a representative sample, that would give us a 1% divorce rate.

    On the so-called Christian side, we have Mark Sanford, Newt Gingrich, holy Kim Davis (three times), Pam bondi,that billy graham grandson, also Ned Graham, Charles Stanley, Richard Roberts son of oral, Amy Grant, Amy Semple McPherson. Those are just off the top of my head. You can Google “famous Christian divorces” and fill the Hong Kong phone book with all the wongs committed.

    There was a Barna study a few years ago that indicated that conservative Christians divorce that a higher rate than regular people, if I recall it properly.

  • Ben in oakland

    Sorry, AutoCorrect strikes again. Malachi.

  • Michael Glass

    Jesus also said – and I quote from the Douay Version which warns the reader: “This text is not to be taken in the literal sense…”

    “…and there are eunuchs who have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven. He that can take, let him take it.” Matthew 19:12

    We don’t take this text literally, so why should we take Matthew 19:8 literally? Many people have divorced and remarried happily. Why should anyone feel guilty about that?

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  • Greg1

    Ben, One becomes a Christian when he/she first “believes” in Christ, AND is “baptized.” And to become a Christian means to be “joined” to the Body of Christ. That said, the soul of the Christian is no longer just a lifeless soul in the body, but is animated–full of divine life. God himself takes up residence in that soul. So when two Christians get married, their souls are joined together in a spiritual way, where God treats the two souls as one. In fact God is the 3rd party in every Christian marriage. All three are exist together. So divorce from this holy union is sinful; it might be necessary if indeed there was abuse, or other, but the two are still joined by God. So even though divorce is necessary at times, remarriage is a violation of the Christian vow, and spiritual marital reality. So it is best to remain single once divorced. As for non-christian marriages, they are called natural marriages, and don’t have the spiritual bond that a Christian marriage does.

  • Dominic

    What’s all this nitpicking about literal or figurative meanings of Scriptural passages? Divorce is clearly a rejection of a couple’s vows before God on fidelity to each other. Society is always there to say the “grass is greener” if you divorce and find your “real self”. I can’t think of a happy divorce. It is a sign of failure, of selfishness, or sometimes the end result of adultery… another sin.
    So if you don’t call it a sin, you can’t call it a virtue or a celebration of life. It should be avoided, not aspired to.

  • larry

    “What’s all this nitpicking about literal or figurative meanings of Scriptural passages? ”

    Its called pointing out how use of such passages amounts to “Do as I say, not as I do”. 🙂

    Its always read figuratively when applied TO evangelical Christians but literally when coming FROM evangelical Christians.

  • Jeff Mayhugh

    What is true in Christianity is not determined by surveys of Christians.

    What is true in Christianity is determined by Scripture.

    That a large majority of Christians take their beliefs from secular America does not change the teachings of Christianity.

    Yes, divorce is caused by sin (or one or the other partner). Sin can be repented of and forgiven. But because marriage is forever the problem is when divorced people try to re-marry.

  • Larry

    So you are saying Christians generally only pay lip service to the ideas of their own faith. That doesn’t do much for the frequent claims of moral and spiritual superiority over others typically expressed by them.

  • Louis

    Ben in Oakland, those gay marriages are not real marriages.

    Of course they would not divorce, anymore than I would “divorce” from my best friend or my cat (since the word “marriage” is being lowered to the point of simple co-habitation and without any of the responsibility, benefit to society or fidelity (i.e., monogamy) that true marriage implies).

  • charles hoffman

    The Jewish Bible recognizes that marriages will be terminated, but it regulates the process to prevent various abuses – including using divorce as a cover for wife-swapping.

    Rabbinic Judaism spends a lot of effort on explaining various procedures to be followed in marriage termination, but rarely gives the process itself any negative connotation.

    To treat divorce as sin is to condemn all unhappy relationships to the condition of either living in misery, being sinners for terminating a marriage, or being criminals (and also sinners) for killing off one of the spouses.

  • mike

    This is not the first time Grossman turned some propaganda from the Southern Baptist-owned Lifeway into a story, giving the organization and it’s “research” legitimacy.

    I suspect there is a lack of journalistic objectivity on Grossman’s part. Her story in June was a perfect example: http://religionnews.com/2015/06/03/americans-look-kindly-churches-might-even-go-sometime/

  • Jack

    Check back in a decade, Ben. You’re dreaming if you think it will remain 1%.

    At the risk of being accused of falling for the “no-true-Christian” fallacy, I have to say it was either Barna or someone else who, in a different poll where he was measuring the number of actual or practicing evangelicals, asked other questions besides the obvious — ie do you believe you have a personal relationship with Christ. He asked about objective factors like church attendance and found that the number of evangelicals dropped substantially. Once you poll a sample of this much smaller group — ie perhaps 10 to 20 million people rather than 80 to 100 million — you find a much lower divorce rate.

    Still, the divorce rate is high among professing evangelicals….higher than that of any other religious group in America except for Jews, who score the highest.

    It’s ironic that Jews and professing evangelicals have America’s highest divorce rates. But life is filled with irony.

  • Jack

    I was about to say that Molokai is in Hawaii…..

    It does say in Malachi that God hates divorce, but contextually, that doesn’t mean the Bible teaches that divorce is always wrong….the same Old Testament that includes the book of Malachi includes the Torah or Law of Moses. And as Jesus later noted, the Torah allows for divorce, albeit due to the hardness of people’s hearts, as He added.

    Malachi, as a prophet, obviously knew about the Torah….the job of a prophet was to turn his people back to Torah.

    So contextually, Malachi was not advocating a ban on all divorce. Rather, he was opposing divorce for any old reason. And divorce was a kind of social injustice, as men were the initiators and did so for any reason, which could lead to destitution on the part of divorced wives.

  • Jack

    Ben, Malachi could not have meant a total ban on divorce, for the simple reason that the Law of Moses, which was the ultimate standard to which every Old Testament prophet, Malachi included, appealed, allowed for divorce.

    He was preaching against divorce at the drop of a hat — as the norm as opposed to a drastic exception.

    And Jesus was saying the same thing. He said “except for sexual immorality.” You can’t just skip over those words as though he never uttered them. They connote a very clear exception.

    And note as well that the context was men divorcing women at the drop of a hat. Men were initiating almost all divorces, creating social injustice since men held most of the economic wealth and power.

  • Jack

    I think she’s quite fair, actually…..and I’m someone she yelled at in the past, along with Larry, for our back-and-forth regarding posts.

    I disagreed with her pointedly on that, but think she is still a good writer who is more fair than most other writers on this board.

  • ben in oakland

    Yes, Louis. they are real marriages. As real as yours. You can believe they are not real marriages, you can assert it, you can even claim you speak for god.

    But you don’t speak for anyone but yourself.

  • Jack

    Charles, your view takes the issue of divorce to the opposite extreme….moreover, it ignores Malachi, who gives divorce a decidedly “negative connotation.”

    Divorce is a very negative thing, especially on children. The absolutist position that it’s always wrong goes too far, but so does your position that it’s nothing more than a procedural headache.

    The Biblical position — ie the Law of Moses plus Malachi’s snapshot view — is that it’s a bad thing that should be avoided if at all possible, and that if it’s proposed, there ought to be an extraordinary, exceptional justification for it.

    Put another way, just because the law allows something for a number of reasons, that doesn’t mean it’s okay — not everything that is legal is moral. In all but the worst societal tyrannies, there’s necessarily a gap between what’s legal and what’s moral.

    Thus Malachi wasn’t trying to rewrite the Law of Moses, only to get to the heart of God behind the Law.

  • ben in oakland

    I don’t doubt that you are correct, Jack. I have NEVER claimed we are better than anyone else– something that a certain class of so-called Christian does all of the time.

    but then, that was my actual point. And it is too bad. Were I in a position to do so, I would be advising many couples not to get married until they have absolutely made a commitment to each other that they are unlikely to break. But then, when I was a wedding photographer, I clearly saw that about 20% of the couples whose weddings I photographed had no idea what a bad idea their marriage actually was.

    They had no business marrying anyone at that stage in their lives, let alone the person they had chosen. But oh, well! they were asking me to photograph their weddings, not participate in them, not give them my approval, or anything else. I was a vendor, not their moral arbiter.

  • Larry

    As a matter of practicality and sanity, the whole notion of categorically treating marriage and divorce in absolute terms as sanctified or sinful, removed from personal context and situations is absolutely ridiculous and counterproductive.

    No culture has ever implemented a monogamous marriage for life under all circumstances. Even when the religion or culture forbids it, marriages end up being dissolved by other means. Abandonment used to be the most common form.

    People who are not celebrities do not marry and divorce at a drop of a hat. Divorce is usually a painful process for everyone involved and seldom entered into lightly. No need to compound the distress with notions of “sin” here.
    Marriages that are no longer functional generate misery for all people involved if staying together for such arbitrary reasons as culture and notions of sin.

  • Jack

    Well, Ben, this reminds me of a time when I “invested” in equipment for a friend who was an aspiring wedding photographer. His first event was that of a older friend we both knew well. On the day of the wedding, he confided in us that he feared he was making a mistake. We said nothing to him, because we had offered our opinion long before that….(negative).

    He went through with it in part because he felt sorry for the woman who was both a loner and lonely. They had two kids…and once they grew up, he divorced her.

    The friend who was a photographer later got married, but a week before the marriage, he had second thoughts. In that case, I encouraged him to go through with it because I knew them both well and saw it as a good fit. I was right and they’re still married. I just spoke with him and her yesterday and gave her some second-career advice.

  • Jack

    Larry, you’re attacking one extreme on marriage and divorce, but are advocating the opposite extreme.

    Most non-celebrities don’t marry and divorce at the drop of a hat, but some do. Enough people do that it creates a societal problem if there are children involved.

    If we’re honest, we’ll admit that sin, or whatever name you wish to call it, is a given in everyone’s life, whether they’re married, divorced, widowed, or never married. People have a deeply rooted tendency to put themselves and their own needs ahead of others, even those closest to them. Even the finest human beings have had a long struggle in pushing back against it.

    Every marriage must deal with this fact, because every marriage includes two people (at least for now…..until polygamy returns, which it will, for obvious reasons) who bring this inherent selfishness into their union.

    And thus every marriage is capable of ending in divorce. So it’s not as black and white as you claim.

  • Larry

    What extreme? I am acknowledging divorce is not a simple matter. My point is even when cultures forbade divorce, it still happened. Marriages still dissolved.

    In practice, demonizing divorce and considering marriage sanctified has produced far more negative effects than positive. It spurs people to get married for reasons which will undermine it over time (cultural duty to “settle down” is a big one). It keeps couples together when they probably shouldn’t.

    “And thus every marriage is capable of ending in divorce. So it’s not as black and white as you claim.”

    There is no black and white in my claim. That is the whole point of discussing marriage and divorce in terms of “sin”. To make black and white judgments of unions without relation to real life context. You are misreading me. My point is that discussing marriage and divorce from such a generalized POV has always been inherently pointless and destructive.

  • Shawnie5

    “That doesn’t do much for the frequent claims of moral and spiritual superiority ” Those claims are nonexistent.

  • Larry

    How is this for a pre-wedding jitters story:

    I am at a post-bachelor’s party brunch with the prospective groom and our mutual friends. The guy tells us he has been carrying out an affair with a co-worker. But he wanted to go through the marriage because he was both afraid to tell his prospective wife and it would cause so much trouble to cancel the plans for their families. Plus he was hung up on the idea that as a Jewish man he had to marry a Jewish woman (his mistress was not Jewish).

    I told him simply, “run away”, “don’t show up to the wedding”, “tell her its off, ASAP”, “This will not end well”. He did not take my advice. It was a very painful wedding to watch to say the least. About 6 months later, the new bride filed for an annulment. She wrangled it from a judge who was a friend of the family through what can best be described as consensual perjury.

    He eventually married the woman he had the affair with, 2 kids and 10 years later are still together.

  • Larry

    I wish that was true. If only it were so. 🙂

  • Rionni

    The reason why so many get a divorce is because they don’t agree
    their sin is wrong/refuse to Repent/submit to Jesus which is why so
    many so called “Christians” get divorced. They have premarital sex
    then get married thinking they covered it up but never Repent and
    agree premarital sex is wrong so when they get the divorce they go
    then right back to having premarital sex again because they never
    Repented/made Christ Lord. Until so called “Christians” Repent and
    ask Christ to be Lord of their life the high divorce rate will continue.

  • Larry

    I take it you are either not married or don’t have honest conversations with your spouse.

  • ben in oakland

    This is what I don’t understand.

    God hates divorce, but that doesn’t mean that he forbids it. It’s just a “negative connotation.

  • ben in oakland

    Sorry, shawnie. As I have remarked repeatedly regarding you, it shows up all of the time.

    It shows up in four times married clerk Kim Davis, who has no problem with her own sins, or the sins of not believing her particular beliefs. But only with gay people, whom she doesn’t hate at all, but thinks merely that she doesn’t have to do her job for.

    It shows up every time one of our resident homobigots declares that gay people are attacking marriage by getting married, and that religious people own the word marriage, so gay people shouldn’t be able to use it at all.

    As you hsave heard me say many times, not all bigotry is hate. so much of it is that always present but completely unwarranted belief in ones superiority as a human being, a moral person, or a certain class of so-called Chrisatian.

  • Jack

    It’s not so hard to understand once you think about it.

    If God created humans without sin, and marriage to be joyful and for life, then once sin entered the world, it made marriage a more difficult and complicated thing: The bliss of full union — sexual, emotional, psychological, and spiritual — became marred by each person’s struggles against their own selfishness and against the selfishness of their partner.

    Sin also clouded people’s ability to make wise decisions — such as whom to marry — or, in places where parents arranged marriages, it clouded parental ability to make good choices.

    Given those circumstances, God would hate divorce while at the same time make some provision for it for the sake of human sanity and the original intent of marriage. Put another way, He would permit divorce, but with a heavy heart….or because He hated other things even more — such as marriages in name only, where the heart of it has been shattered — as in adultery.

  • Jack

    I agree that it’s no simple matter, and that argues against absolute prohibitions, religious or legal, against divorce.

    That’s one extreme….but the other extreme is to conclude that because it’s no simple matter, it’s never wrong.

    And that leads to trouble, including people giving up too quickly rather than attempting to work things out.

    That may not have observable consequences if the couple is childless or if the children are grown, but it can have serious consequences for children who are still young enough to be dependent in every way.

    I have met far too many people who were children of divorce who are still feeling its pain as adults. And what they seem to feel is less the pain of parents fighting prior to the divorce and more the pain of parents separating and staying separate as per the divorce.

    Listen to them carefully and you will hear a collective cry for parents to try to work things out even if their marriage is less than blissful.

  • Rionni

    Larry the reason why so many get drunk is because they don’t agree their sin is wrong/refuse to Repent/submit to Jesus which is why so many drunk “Christians” get divorced drunk with Solomon. They have premarital sex drunk then get married drunk thinking they covered it up but never Repent and agree drunk premarital sex is wrong so when they get the divorce they go then right back to having drunk premarital sex again because they never
    Repented drunk. Until so called “Christians” Repent and ask drunk Christ to be drunk Lord of their life the high divorce rate will continue with drunk spouses honestly.

  • Jack

    Now that’s a pre-wedding-jitters story to remember, Larry.

  • Shawnie5

    “…at always present but completely unwarranted belief in ones superiority as a human being, a moral person, or a certain class of so-called Chrisatian.”

    Belief in one’s superiority as a moral human being precludes Christianity altogether, Ben. It makes Christ’s atoning work pointless. This is why Christ said “I did not come to call the righteous (a class of zero) but sinners (which includes everyone) to repentance.”

  • Greg1

    Yes, I think that sums up the human condition. As we have come to understand, the fallen angels were created with perfect knowledge, and due to that, their one bad choice, led to their eternal separation from God. Humans, however, were created differently (less perfect), and although they failed the first test, their failure only led to a less perfect condition. God, then, is able to give man many chances before finally cutting him off from eternal life in heaven. I guess the saying “ignorance is bliss” sort of sums up our relationship with the Trinity. God will not force man to Love Him, but no man in hell today can say God didn’t give him a fair chance. Every situation is considered fairly at each of our Judgments.

  • Ben in Oakland

    Don’t tell ME.

    Tell THEM– or yourself, as the case may be.

  • Shawnie5

    When I see a Christian around here claiming superiority, I might. But so far, about the only one I have seen singing odes to his own virtues has been you.

  • Larry

    No Jack, you are trying to add things to my argument which I did not state. There is nothing extreme about saying absolute judgments on marriage are silly and counterproductive. You have problems identifying extremism.

    You still want to make such wide sweeping absolute judgments. Ones entirely removed from individual situations and context. You can’t say whether marriage or divorce is categorically good or bad. You have to see individual situations. The whole discussion of the “sin” of divorce is nonsense. It intentionally ignores context and individual facts. Merely adding arbitrary rules to personal emotional situations where it is not required and only damaging.

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  • Peter

    Sounds like the church needs to spend more time talking about divorce. It tears families apart, hurts the children, and has a wide range of other negative impacts on the community over the long term – and the divorce rate is really out of control. Maybe it desrves as much or more attention as gay rights, abortion, politics …

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  • ben in oakland

    Maybe? Maybe?

    Exactly what harm does my life do to these people except to offend them? Except for those who are thoroughly enticed and interested in it, of course?

    here’s what someone just said about divorce: “It tears families apart, hurts the children, and has a wide range of other negative impacts on the community over the long term – and the divorce rate is really out of control.”

    but doing something about it might actually and seriously inconvenience heterosexuals. And you cannot create a grift industry by opposing what so many heterosexuals either do or wish they would do– including so many of the moralizing busybodies that call themselves pastors and Christian politicians.

    Let’s deal first with the very real, very massive problems of heterosexuality marriage and heterosexual morality, and THEN perhaps we can say something about gay people.

    Or is that just too logsy and motesy?

  • Bernardo

    Adultery can be very expensive even if one does not consider it to be a sin. Ask anyone who has been divorced because of it.

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  • Shawnie5

    That’s true. That is one reason why it is far less common among the upper and upper-middle classes.

    As I once heard one of my husband’s colleagues put it quite vulgarly at a party: “There is no p***** that’s worth half your wealth.”

  • Shawnie5

    …why DIVORCE is far less common…Sorry for the vagueness.

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