• Pingback: School district investigates mass baptism filmed at football practice - mosaicversemosaicverse()

  • Pingback: The New America: Secular Zealots demonize Christian conversions in Ga. high school | Laodicean Report()

  • Greg1

    Whether anyone likes it or not, God is in our lives, as we would not even exist if Almighty God did not allow us to remain in existence. And although I do not agree with the coach doing something as important as Christening some of these players at a football practice, rather than in their respective churches, I would agree that if all were on board, then it is taxpayer funded property, and that includes the taxpayers present on that field.

  • bthomas

    The students and coach are to be applauded for faithfully living out their commitment to Christ in the public sphere. Secularists and pagans and atheists will decry this act as an outrageous disregard for the COTUS. Accommodationists will counsel bowing to Caesar in public matters and keeping ones commitment to Christ a private personal matter. The COTUS does not so restrict the public practice of personal faith in Christ. That is an innovation of those who would restrict faith to a carefully prescribed private realm.

    People of faith have exactly the same rights to act publicly and to make use of facilities paid for by their tax dollars as are afforded to any other interest group. Govt. employees have every right to speak/act about religious faith just as they do of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation or any other issue. Seculars and others will have to accept the inconvenient truth that persons of faith will not consent to be forced to practice their faith in a…

  • Larry

    Nothing like coercive religious rites to show why we still need separation of church and state. Since the coach was involved its easy to see that players would be penalized for not participating. Forced ritual as only the theocratic bent would have it.

    Greg1, Bthomas, thanks for showing how little you regard religious freedom. Your God doesn’t ever need my tax dollars. Had that been an inam or Buddhist monk performing a rite over the coach and team you would be gathering torches and pitchforks. Glad to know that you regard our Constitution and its freedoms like toilet paper.

  • Mike

    This is more than dumb. So one has to be evangelical Christian, adult baptism believing, this-man-made version of religion to be on the team?

    What about Catholics, Orthodox, mainline protestants, everyone who disagrees with this denomination, and non-Christians, are they allowed to play?

    In the case of Catholics, Orthodox and other mainstream Christians, they were already baptized – this ritual would not be allowed in their church. By forcing them to do this, you have violated not only the law potentially but simple decency.

    This isn’t about living out one’s faith, it’s imposing on everyone else. How can anyone not see that? It’s one thing if this is a religious private school – it can be somewhat expected, even then not forced – however, this should not be allowed by a public school.

  • Re: “Whether anyone likes it or not, God is in our lives …”

    Your deity isn’t in my life. I defy you to demonstrate otherwise.

  • Re: “The students and coach are to be applauded for faithfully living out their commitment to Christ in the public sphere.”

    Was there any particular reason they had to do it at a high school? There were no churches available? Or are baptisms only valid when conducted on government property?

  • Re: “What about Catholics, Orthodox, mainline protestants, everyone who disagrees with this denomination, and non-Christians, are they allowed to play?”

    Excellent point. This kind of militant Christianism can only lead to sectarian conflict. Forcing every American to convert to Christianity is only the first step in a process. The next is deciding which sect(s) are “‘Real’ Christianity” and which aren’t sufficient. Let the holy wars begin!

  • Jimmy Mac

    It was in freakin’ GEORGIA, fer crying out loud! You expected an intelligent action there????

    GEORGIA!!!!!!!

  • cesar

    Perfectly said Larry. There was an outcry in California over yoga classes being offered at a high school as an option for Physical Education. Christian parents went nuts claiming their children were being exposed to Hinduism and other pagan rituals. The courts rejected their claim after they observed the class was teaching only stretching and posture exercises. As you say, imagine if it would been an Iman or a Buddhist monk performing a ritual on school properties. I would bet that if you interviewed each one of those kids you would have some who did not wish to be a part of that but felt pressure. Peer pressure. Imagine. Beginning with the Coach! Wow.

  • ZeGemans

    How would you determine “all were on board”? Would you conduct a public poll to see who was a xian and who wasn’t? Haven’t really thought that one all the way through, have you…

    As for your opening statement, it’s hogwash – I don’t accept the existence of any deity; there just isn’t any evidence to support that extraordinary claim. So me “liking” god is irrelevant – it’s like saying I “like/dislike” unicorns.

  • Sorry, my bad. I foolishly assumed Georgians were able to figure things out like that …

  • obsever

    I agree. Many churches have infant baptism or alternative forms of baptism and consider it unnecessary or even sacrilegious to be baptized again. This is why religion and public schools do not mix.

  • C

    Wow, the vitriol by all of those that claim they don’t believe in God….then why are you spending so much time on this site, spewing your hatred and angst against Christians??? Something is stirred in your soul as you search for truth and can’t seem to put you finger on it. No Christian is going to give you what you need to believe or to understand, that can ONLY come through a sincere heart that seeks answers from God.
    Also, I didn’t see any evidence that the coach was requiring this as a part of being on the team like everyone is pointing to? The idea that students don’t want to ‘cross’ their coach would be the same idea when espousing homosexuality as normal, socialism as a desirable alternative, abortion as needed, etc, by teachers within our schools every day, what’s the difference? You don’t mind the espousing of beliefs in schools as long as they are YOUR beliefs…….who’s intolerant now???

  • Larry

    After all it was just a little coercive religious right appropriating public property in violation of the law. What gives?

    As I said before, it the clergy was not Christian and doing something similar, you would be threatening to burn the person’s home down by now. Your mendacity and disregard for notions of religious freedom is duly noted.

    “Also, I didn’t see any evidence that the coach was requiring this as a part of being on the team like everyone is pointing to?”

    Try again. He was participating in the ceremony, on school grounds. So that means he is handling it as in a leadership position for the team.

    School prayer is only permissible if it is NOT LED BY THE TEACHERS OR STAFF. Then is is assumed to be coerced.

    “who’s intolerant now???”

    You are. You are the one who signs off on using coercion and stealing public resources to promote sectarian discrimination. Religious freedom does not mean forcing others to follow the rites of your faith.

  • Kelly

    This was supposedly after school and before football practice began… Is that correct? My daughter was coerced DURING SCHOOL just two weeks before she turned 18 to ditch her college plans to become a commercial pilot by Marine recruiters in her school. Who cares about a mass baptism? My child was told that if she wanted to be a pilot she should enlist in the marines, it was a ‘guaranteed’ thing, complete with a t-shirt. WHY on earth are military recruiters allowed to come into schools to lie to our children with no recourse? And people worry about baptism… Nobody gets sent to Afghanistan because they were baptized before football practice… Good grief!

  • Pingback: Christian News Weekly Recap – Week of 8/30/2015 - Zeteo 3:16()

  • bthomas

    Was there any particular reason why the school was for this purpose not a good location? Are we to suppose that personal religious faith is only to be practiced with a particular building or at a particular time? Given that citizens who are committed Christians or Jews or whatever are citizens, are they to have their rights under the COTUS limited due to the scruples of others who object to that religious practice? Any reasonable man would of course agree that citizens have exactly the same rights to speak/act on public property regardless of if that property is a school, park, court house lawn, etc. The commons are not limited/restricted to only those who have no religious commitment. The commons are … the commons, open to citizens of all faith and practices.

  • Christopher Howell Hollis

    Umm….no they don’t have that right. Despite your childishly petulant attempt to claim otherwise. Please keep your indoctrinated belief in fairy tales out of public schools and away from my children.

  • Mike

    Kelli,

    If she regrets her decision and hasn’t gone to boot camp yet, just tell her ‘dont go to the processing center’. They will try a couple more times, threaten this or that, however nothing can be done since she isn’t technically under the UCMJ and there is no civil penalty for changing one’s mind at this point.

    As to recruiter lies – yes, they are worse than used car salesman, the promises are meaningless unless its on paper and then it can be changed for ‘the good of the Corps’.

    On the other hand, she might have an easier shot at being a pilot after military service. I wouldn’t bank on her getting to be a pilot in the USMC though. Why didn’t she go AirForce?

  • Re: “Are we to suppose that personal religious faith is only to be practiced with a particular building or at a particular time?”

    Anywhere but government property is just fine.

    Re: “Given that citizens who are committed Christians or Jews or whatever are citizens, are they to have their rights under the COTUS limited due to the scruples of others who object to that religious practice?”

    Who denied them their “right” to have baptisms? Police didn’t storm into churches to tear down baptismal fonts or anything, or to arrest clergy baptizing people there. This isn’t about the right to baptize, which people certainly have. It’s about whether it’s permissible on government property, which it’s not.

    Re: “The commons are not limited/restricted to only those who have no religious commitment.”

    I’m not aware that religious folk are barred from setting foot on “the commons” solely because they’re religious. Whoever told you that?

  • Pingback: Kardashian pope * Kim Davis * Beef party : September's Religious Freedom Recap - On Freedom()