Sen. Ted Cruz, Ben Carson top choices at evangelicals event

Print More
Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidate U.S. Senator Ted Cruz addresses attendees at the RedState Gathering in Atlanta, Georgia, on August 8, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Tami Chappell
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-CRUZ-PP, originally transmitted on August 25, 2015.

Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidate U.S. Senator Ted Cruz addresses attendees at the RedState Gathering in Atlanta, Georgia, on August 8, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Tami Chappell *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-CRUZ-PP, originally transmitted on August 25, 2015.

Active RNS subscribers and members can view this content by logging-in here.

Donald Trump, who came to the Values Voter Summit waving a Bible, came in well behind Cruz, a preacher's son, and Carson, a Seventh Day Adventist.

  • Larry

    Ben Carson is kind of interesting.

    Would the pervasive racism of the GOP keep them from voting for a black man in the primaries in large numbers? All signs point to it.

    Ted Cruz is a 2nd Generation theocrat. If he survives the primaries, he as a little “Daddy issue” which will dog him. A father who is notorious for making ridiculous public pronouncements, yet is well respected by the “social conservatives”
    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/11/07/the-six-craziest-quotes-from-ted-cruz-s-father-rafael-cruz.html

    http://www.salon.com/2013/08/21/there%E2%80%99s_no_cruz_control/

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=raphael+cruz+insane&qpvt=raphael+cruz+insane&FORM=VQFRML

  • Bernardo

    They are wasting their and our money and time. No pro-live, anti-abortion candidates can win. Women (and men) who have had abortions since R vs W now number between 60-80 million and all are voters. (There are roughly 55 million registered Republicans. There are roughly 72 million Democrats. And there are roughly 42 million registered independents) and the 60-80 million R vs W voters are spread across these political parties.

    Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_registered_republican_voters_are_there_in_America#ixzz1n7ShWVn4

  • Larry

    “No pro-live, anti-abortion candidates can win.”

    The Republicans had a good run from 1980-2008 on such platforms.

  • Jack

    Rightly or wrongly, abortion is not a deciding issue for pro-lifers, pro-choicers, or the majority of Americans who line up between the two views. Most voters rank other issues higher. There are plenty of pro-choice voters who have voted for pro-life politicians and plenty of pro-life voters who’ve voted for pro-choice candidates.

    I’ve tried to explain this to Bernardo, but clearly to no avail.

  • Bernardo

    Jack,

    Obviously, you missed the results of the last two presidential elections and the Obama pro-choice ads that bombarded the air wave before said elections. Might also want to peruse the top five issues of some of the candidates reviewed by RN.

  • Larry

    Depends on the part of the country you are in. The conservatives in some states take it far more seriously than others.

    Opposing abortion and now marriage equality are issues that get “social conservatives” to vote in groups and usually vote Republican. But realistically neither platform has even the remotest chance of being accepted on a national level. You have SCOTUS cases against them and the possibility of constitutional amendments for such positions are at nil.

    It was always a way to get poor people to vote against their economic interests (attacking regulation, organized labor, social programs, and supporting various subsidies for heavy industry).

  • Bernardo

    Larry,

    The discussion is about the presidential election not the local elections.

  • Larry

    Every Republican presidential candidate, since Reagan has used an anti-abortion platform. Its all just hogwash to get poor bible thumpers to vote against their economic interests.

    The results have been mixed. It is too polarizing an issue to make or break elections. Swing voters are largely uninterested.

  • Garson Abuita

    As much as I disagree with the “values” of the Value Voters Summit, I’m happy to see confirmation of the earlier poll of likely GOP Iowa caucus-goers, who trend heavily evangelical: The evangelical vote is not fooled by Trump. His latest 15 minutes are up.

  • Jack

    Bernardo, for about 90% of the electorate, it does not matter whether a candidate is pro-life or pro-choice. Everybody has an opinion on this issue, but few people actually prioritize it over other issues.

    Now repeat after me, Bernardo:

    Most people don’t prioritize the abortion issue.
    Most people don’t prioritize the abortion issue.
    Most people don’t prioritize the abortion issue.
    Most people don’t prioritize the abortion issue.
    Most people don’t prioritize the abortion issue.

    If you were in high school, and I were your teacher, and the topic was civics or politics, I’d roll out an old-fashioned blackboard and make you write the above at least 100 times.

  • Jack

    Now that’s what lefty Democrats have been consoling themselves ever since they began hemorrhaging blue collar families in the 1970s and 1980s:

    “The poor wretches just don’t know how much they need us socialists….er….I mean Democrats.”

    Not a thought about how maybe, just maybe, those policies were not in these people’s best interests….Hard to imagine policies based on a value system that puts “the environment” ahead of human beings, including blue collar workers, is going to gain blue collar support.

    But of course, these people can’t think for themselves and calculate their own interests. Only the elites can do it on their behalf — even though most of the elites are so insulated from the real economy, they don’t know or care what actually works and what doesn’t work in it.

  • Jack

    I think you’re right, Garson…..and I certainly hope you’re right….from your mouth to God’s ears, as they say.

  • Jack

    Larry, you don’t know what you’re talking about. Ben Carson’s rise in spite of having zero political experience and an extremely low-key persona is a testament to the virtual absence of racism among Republicans.

    That fact was on vivid display in 2000, when Alan Keyes, another black Republican, won the Alabama presidential caucus.

    Alabama — home of George Wallace, Bull Connor, and generation after generation of other populist Democratic demagogues fanning the flames of class envy coupled with race baiting.

    Republicanism’s triumph in Alabama directly correlated with Keyes’ victory. The old Alabama Democrats would have lynched Keyes. The new Alabama Republicans voted for him for president of the United States.

    The real racists are where they’ve always been — the Democratic party, which literally can’t stop talking or thinking about race for a single day. It’s been that way for nearly two centuries. They can’t see black people as equals.

  • Jack

    I don’t think anybody on either side is a “theocrat,” at least not from an American perspective.

    Of course, from a foreign, French perspective, anybody who is for protecting religious as well as non-religious expression in the public square is a theocrat.

    It’s the French version of secularism, known as laicite, that Larry along with his radical friends embraces with revolutionary fervor.

    Revolution as in French Revolution, not American Revolution.

    Earth to Larry:

    This is America, not France.