US, Canadian denominations to sign mutual recognition pact

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Delegates vote on the United Church of Christ and the United Church of Canada communion agreement. Photo courtesy of The United Church of Canada

Delegates vote on the United Church of Christ and the United Church of Canada communion agreement. Photo courtesy of The United Church of Canada

(RNS) Two of North America’s most liberal Protestant church groups have teamed up and agreed to recognize each other’s members, ministers and sacraments.

The United Church of Christ and the United Church of Canada will celebrate their full communion agreement on Oct. 17 at a church in Niagara Falls. Leaders from the two denominations will sign the agreement during the service.

Full communion means the two denominations will recognize each other’s members, ordained ministers and sacraments.

The Rev. Karen Georgia A. Thompson, ecumenical and interfaith officer of the United Church of Christ, said the ceremony’s location near the Canadian-U.S. border symbolizes the groups’ desire to work together.

“It shows unity through international lines,” she said.

The Rev. Karen Georgia A. Thompson, ecumenical and interfaith officer of the United Church of Christ. Photo courtesy of The United Church of Canada

The Rev. Karen Georgia A. Thompson, ecumenical and interfaith officer of the United Church of Christ. Photo courtesy of the United Church of Canada

Both church groups have been supportive of social justice work, ordination of women and inclusion of LGBT people.


READ: United Church of Christ to boycott Washington Redskins


The United Church of Canada, the country’s largest Protestant denomination, has recently been embroiled in a controversy over a suburban Toronto pastor who is an atheist. Leaders of the Canadian church are reviewing the ordination of Rev. Gretta Vosper, author of “With or Without God,” and her supporters have mounted a letter-writing and fundraising campaign.

The United Church of Canada has about 3 million members in more than 3,500 congregations. The United Church of Christ has close to 1 million members, with 5,100 U.S. churches.

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  • Paul

    These are not Christian churches. They are a group of people who believe in doing good and are concerned with social injustice. Most barely believe in God. Gretta Vosper might as well be the leader of the local Kiwanis club. Then again maybe not. The Kiwanis may believe in Christ more than she does.

    My suggestion would be for all of these people to find a church that believes that Christ actually died on the cross for the actual purpose He said – to redeem us from death and hell. He claimed to be the literal Son of God. If you don’t believe that you might as well join Gretta. Her doctrine can save you as well as these two so-called ‘Christian’ churches