Bishops admit: We don’t know much about sex, need married advisers

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Pope Francis leads the synod on the family in the Synod hall at the Vatican, on October 5, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Max Rossi  
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-SYNOD-DISCUSSION, originally transmitted on Oct. 6, 2015.

Pope Francis leads the synod on the family in the Synod hall at the Vatican, on October 5, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Max Rossi *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-SYNOD-DISCUSSION, originally transmitted on Oct. 6, 2015.

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VATICAN CITY (RNS) Fourteen married couples and other lay people have been brought in to fill the gaps in the churchmen's knowledge, advising the 270 bishops as they discuss family issues.

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  • Deacon John M Bresnahan

    There are many thousands of married ordained clergy in the Catholic Church- mostly ignored by the media. My wife and I raised 4 children and have 8 grandchildren and have talked over many family issues with the pastors I have worked with. We deacons can provide many insights into what it means to raise a family that takes religion very seriously but also are steeped in the secular world .

  • Bernardo

    Don’t know much about sex? Well there is an easy solution. And it really is not that complicated. Wikipedia’s review of human sexuality takes about 30 minutes to digest.

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  • Betty Clermont

    “Laypeople play an important part” but are excluded from discussions and voting. “Fourteen married couples have been brought in” e.g members of the
    Neocatechumenal Way, another couple “are currently executive secretaries of the Mexican Episcopal Conference’s commission for the family.” (vaticaninsider.lastampa.it). No independent, reform-minded laity allowed who might speak to the press.

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  • Larry

    So why shouldn’t you be full fledged clergy?

    Why would you have to defer to the authority of those who have foregone families and “adult relations” when it comes to Canon law and dogma on such subjects?

    This was one of many sticking points for the Protestant Reformation. 🙂

  • Deacon John M Bresnahan

    Larry–deacons are full fledged clergy by virtue of their ordination. How they make a living and support their families is a separate issue—some deacons work full time for the Church, some part-time, some on a voluntary basis– compensation (if any) is also a separate issue — in general worked out parish by parish or diocese by diocese.

  • Larry

    You are not a priest. You will always be considered no more than an auxiliary to the priests and Church hierarchy in general. You do not take the vows of chastity they require for such authority.

    So instead you subordinate yourself on such subjects to people who deliberately avoid personal knowledge about such things.

    It was issues like this which were brought up centuries ago and remains a point of division between Catholics and Protestants.

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