Anniversary of France’s niqab ban passes almost unnoticed

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Hind Ahmas wears a niqab despite a nationwide ban on the Islamic face veil outside the courts where she arrived with the intention to pay a fine after she was arrested last May for wearing the niqab in public, in Meaux, east of Paris, on September 22, 2011. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Charles Platiau
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-FRANCE-NIQAB, originally transmitted on Oct. 20, 2015.

Hind Ahmas wears a niqab despite a nationwide ban on the Islamic face veil outside the courts where she arrived with the intention to pay a fine after she was arrested last May for wearing the niqab in public, in Meaux, east of Paris, on September 22, 2011. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Charles Platiau *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-FRANCE-NIQAB, originally transmitted on Oct. 20, 2015.

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PARIS (RNS) The gradual transformation of the niqab issue from a national debate to little more than a footnote speaks volumes about French politics.

  • Garson Abuita

    It takes a special kind of politician to say “Hey! Those schoolgirls’ skirts aren’t short enough!” And these are the people who lecture the rest of the world on how to act?

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  • tintin

    I think men should start wearing them, too. Why not? If the women can get away with it, why shouldn’t everyone?
    I want to be able to walk into a bank dressed all in black with a ski mask on….

  • “the actors, after spotting the woman in the front row, threatened to stop the performance if she didn’t take off the veil”

    Interesting.

    If a Klu Klux Klan member refused to remove his white sheet I’m sure the reaction would be similar. Anger from all sides.
    But even so, the person wearing the sheet should have the right to wear it – along with the humiliation for doing so.

    Free speech is superior to this French fascism. The French laws are eager to ridicule – good for them!
    But it is a shame they don’t allow people the freedom to humiliate themselves.

    Religion is a public nuisance. But it is more compassionate for believers to learn this early in life – enabled by freedom of expression.