A lesson from Ben Carson’s candidacy: Most physicians don’t have moral authority (COMMENTARY)

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U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson speaks at South Bethel Church in Tipton, Iowa, on November 22, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-CAMOSY-COLUMN, originally transmitted on Nov. 25, 2015.

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson speaks at South Bethel Church in Tipton, Iowa, on November 22, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-CAMOSY-COLUMN, originally transmitted on Nov. 25, 2015.

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(RNS) It is probably best to think of most physicians as specialized organic plumbers. Yet moral judgments are simply assumed to be the province of the medical community.

  • Ben in oakland

    Carson says a lot of things, ranging from outright stupid (men go into prison straight and come out gay, and that’s how gay babies are born) to statements whose veracity leaves a great deal to be striven for.

    Every time he does, the anti-gummint and religious whacks just want to support him more.

    And every time he does, I want to scream at him, “Ben! Ben! It ain’t rocket surgery!”

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  • Larry

    That was a ridiculous article.

    If anything, such things would have given Carson an opportunity to be familiar with: rational arguments, evidence based proof and a sense of professional ethics emphasizing honesty in the face of personal convenience.

    What has led Carson astray has been his religious thinking:

    The notion that one can tell any kind of untruth as long as it is on behalf of The Lord and one has a “righteous cause”.

    The idea that one should ignore evidence and research because of one’s interpretations of religious scripture.

    The idea that people whose beliefs are different must be considered unworthy of consideration as a matter of course.

    Of course a teacher of “theological ethics” is unlikely to criticize the problems of religious based moral thinking.

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  • Pochi Riffel

    Ben Carson’s, I am a Primary Care provider, I disagree with your points about him. I have followed the candidate and his activities and got into evolution videos will say that he is an outstaing individual with knowledge that surpasses anyone who is a current candidate. That wisdom has been given by God. I had a call from an academic professor of a famous university who apologized to me when Ben was at the top a few weeks ago and told me, you were right, he is an amazing candidate. Mr. Romney was attacked like him and gave up, but if Ben stays on, unless the system cheats, if God wants him to be the President, nothing will be able to stop him. Remember John 17:23, Jesus was 33 1/2 years at that time and mentioned that God loves you as much as he loves his son. Instead of criticism, let us pray that our country goes back into IN GOD WE TRUST and become the nation that we were ment to be. God bless America. Pochi is my nickname 🙂

  • Benn

    No, Ben Carson just has a trainable mind. Unfortunately, it’s not a questioning mind, so he fell for the Christian myths hook line and sinker. He’s not presidential material.

    The sooner this country gets past god fairy tales such as the Christian ones, the better.

  • Chris

    Fairy tales like the dignity of the human person?

  • larry

    You don’t see much of that in Christianity. Especially when you start talking about hell and who belongs there.

    You see a lot of “I am doing something because God is supposedly looking over my shoulder”.

    Occasionally, ” you are only entitled to dignity and humanity if you believe and do as I do.”.

    Dignity of the human person, not so much.

  • Noddy

    Actually, this statement is false: ” It takes more faith for you to believe this whole universe came into existence just by chance”. Bringing a god into the mix creates more questions, including many about that god, than it answers, and actually can be viewed as making the problem space more complicated (as well as more contrived).

  • Ben in Oakland

    No, fairy tales like we’re all immersed in horrible sin. All we are worthy of is being tossed into a fiery to burn and suffer for eternity.

    In fact, we’re so horrible that WE MADE GOD WANT TO KILL HIMSELF.

    That doesn’t sound like the dignity of the human person to me. for that matter, it makes God out to be some sort of gangster. “Nice little soul you got there, buddy. You would want something to…happen to it…wouldya?”