Tamerlan Tsarnaev

ANALYSIS: Where are the Christians on burying Tsarnaev?

BOSTON (RNS) Most faith leaders agree everyone deserves a dignified burial, no matter what crimes they’ve committed, as a matter of Christian principle. But a mix of factors is leading them to keep low profiles on the debate over how to handle the remains of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

Alcoholics Anonymous wrestles with its spiritual roots

(RNS) For Alcoholics Anonymous to continue helping addicts find freedom in sobriety, the 75-year-old organization has to reclaim its spiritual roots. That’s the message coming from reformers who say the group has drifted from core principles, but what exactly constitutes the heart of AA spirituality is a matter of spirited debate.

St. Michael's, a church within the Diocese of South Carolina, is one of the most prominent Episcopal churches in Charleston, S.C. RNS photo by Kevin Eckstrom

All eyes on Texas, S.C. church property fights

(RNS) When disgruntled congregations have left hierarchical denominations, civil courts traditionally have said buildings and land are not theirs to keep. But outcomes could be different this year as high-profile cases wind their way through courts in Texas and South Carolina.

RNS photo courtesy Library of Congress

Secession theology runs deep in American religious, political history

(RNS) Ever since President Obama won re-election, more than 700,000 Americans have petitioned the White House to let their respective states secede. Observers say those leading the charge are framing it in terms that suggest a deep-seated religious impulse for purity-through-separation is flaring up once again. This time, it’s playing out on a political stage. By G. Jeffrey MacDonald.

Episcopal Bishop V. Gene Robinson gives the invocation on Sunday, Jan. 18, 2009, to begin the Welcoming Ceremony for Barack Obama's presidential inauguration. Religion News Service photo by David Jolkovski

Gay bishop Gene Robinson sets sights on D.C. as retirement looms

CONCORD, N.H. (RNS) When Gene Robinson became the first openly gay Episcopal bishop in 2003, his election triggered shock waves and fears of schism worldwide. Now, as this lighting-rod figure prepares to retire Jan. 5, he’s leaving New Hampshire for a city that knows polarization all too well: Washington, D.C. By G. Jeffrey MacDonald.