(August 26, 2001) Salman Hamdani, an NYPD cadet and EMT who was killed on 9/11. Photo courtesy Talat Hamdani

Muslim mother seeks justice for the son she lost on 9/11

(RNS) It’s been five years now that Talat Hamdani has been able to talk about her son without crying, but she still prefers mostly not to tell his story. “It’s all over the Internet,” she said. She’s stopped talking about how she initially didn’t worry when her son, Mohammad Salman Hamdani, who was a cadet with the New York City Police Department, didn’t answer his cellphone that night; about how police questioned her and her husband when authorities couldn’t find their son’s body, to see if he had any terrorist connections; about the New York Post headline a month after the attacks — “Missing – Or Hiding? – Mystery Of NYPD Cadet From Pakistan,” that cast him as a suspect in the 9/11 attacks. She’s mostly stopped talking, but she’s still fighting for the recognition she says is due her son.

Muslims listening to the sermon, or khutba, by Imam Suhaib Webb at the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center, on the Islamic holiday of Eid al-Fitr. RNS photo by Omar Sacirbey

What imams talk about during Eid

(RNS) “The Eid khutba is like the State of the Union address,” said Oklahoma-born convert Suhaib Webb, referring to the sermons Muslims heard at mosques around the U.S. as they celebrated the end of Ramadan.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Raymond Kelly (far right), Commissioner of the New York City Police Department (NYPD), at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C., on May 13, 2013.

Muslims oppose possible Raymond Kelly bid for Homeland Security

(RNS) Muslims say that as head of the nation’s biggest police force, the commissioner oversaw a spying program that targeted Muslims based solely on their religion, showed poor judgment by participating in a virulently anti-Islamic film, and approved a report on terrorism that equated innocuous behavior such as quitting smoking with signs of radicalization.

N.C. Gov. Pat McCrory made some tweaks to a law that  critics say discriminates against LGBT people.

NC Muslims hope Gov. Pat McCrory vetoes anti-Shariah bill

(RNS) If Gov. Pat McCrory signs the bill, North Carolina would become the seventh state to have an anti-Shariah law, joining Arizona, Kansas, Louisiana, South Dakota, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. In May, Alabama lawmakers approved a like-minded constitutional amendment that state voters will consider in 2014.

Neon McDonald's sign from Dearborn Heights, Mich. photo courtesy Bruce via Flickr

Concerns rise over halal fraud

(RNS) The booming halal market is often accompanied by a lack of consensus about what constitutes halal. In addition, several well-publicized incidents of fraud have left halal consumers vulnerable to unscrupulous merchants and suspicious about the sources of the products they are buying.