A meeting of Humanist Haven, sponsored by Yale Humanist Community.

Farewell, Faitheist

When I started writing this column, I set out with the goal of lifting up frequently overlooked nontheist perspectives—the atheist voices that are generally ignored by those who are only interested in narratives of conflict and certainty.

Rebecca Vitsmun

2013: Atheism’s 10 defining moments

Atheism was in the headlines perhaps more than ever before in 2013. To highlight some of atheism’s defining moments and trends from the last year, I worked with a panel of ten writers, scholars, and activists to come up with ten major moments or currents in American atheism from 2013. Their contributions are below. Godless congregations become global phenomenon

2013 was a landmark year for atheists, Humanists, and nonreligious people building communities. Ex-pastors Jerry Dewitt and Mike Aus grew innovative and successful congregations in Louisiana and Texas, and the Yale Humanist Community launched in Connecticut.

10 things to expect from my ‘Faitheist’ column

You may be asking yourself: What on earth is a ‘faitheist’? It’s been years since I first heard the term “faitheist”—a pejorative used by some atheists to describe other nontheists who seem too accommodating of religion. As an atheist and an interfaith activist, I decided that I liked the word enough to embrace it. I used the word as the title for my first book, a memoir calling for conversation and cooperation between atheists and people of faith. In reclaiming the word, I understand it to mean that I am an atheist in pursuit of common ground with the religious.

Chris Stedman is the assistant humanist chaplain at Harvard University and author of the new book, “Faitheist: How an Atheist Found Common Ground with the Religious.” Photo courtesy Alex Dakoulas

What’s a ‘Faitheist’? Chris Stedman explains

(RNS) Self-described “faitheist” Chris Stedman calls for atheists and the religious to come together in interfaith work. It is a position that has earned him both strident – even violent –  condemnation and high praise. In an interview with RNS, Stedman talks about how and why the religious and atheists should work together. By Kimberly Winston.