Author Johnny Carr is one of the most vocal proponents of the orphan movement sweeping the American Christian Church.

Taking an active role in orphan care: An interview with Johnny Carr

The American Christian Church is at the cusp of an orphan care and adoption movement, and Johnny Carr is one of its most outspoken and influential proponents. In his new book, Orphan Justice: How to Care for Orphans Beyond Adopting, Carr tells readers that caring for orphans may look different than they assumed. He shares practical ways for Christians to get involved beyond simply adoption, and he urges everyone to move from simply talking about caring for orphans to actually doing something. Johnny Carr serves as Director of Church Partnerships for Bethany Christian Services, America’s largest adoption and orphan care agency. He and his wife, Beth, reside outside of Pittsburgh with their five children, three of which are adopted. 

JM: You say the orphan care movement has been “reduced” to a focus on adoption. In what way is the growth of adoption non-desirable?

Scott McClellan, Author of Tell Me a Story

Becoming storytellers: An interview with Scott McClellan

Scott McClellan, 30, is Communications Pastor at Irving Bible Church and former director of the Echo Conference. He is one of the foremost Christian voices on effective communication and is releasing his first book, Tell Me a Story: Finding God and Ourselves Through Narrative (Moody Publishers). In it, he shares what comprises a good story and how we can begin living better ones. Building on Psalm 107:2, which states, “Let the redeemed of the Lord tell their story …”, makes the case for every Jesus-follower to impact the lives of others by telling their own story of redemption. JM: The concept of story has come into the Christian evangelical lexicon in recent years by other authors like John Eldredge and Don Miller. What’s your take on it?

RobBell

Rob Bell is back

*Update: An editor at HarperOne, the publisher of Rob’s book, has explained to me that the video posted below is NOT the official trailer: “That was simply a behind-the-scenes video on Rob’s creative process. The actual trailer will debut the week of March 4. That video will be less vague about the content of the book.” Former pastor Rob Bell rocked the evangelical world nearly two years ago with the release of his book Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived. Though Bell was no stranger to controversy at the time, nothing he’d said or done previously provoked the kind of reaction that this New York Times bestselling book did. By raising questions about traditional views on hell, he became the target of attacks by some conservative Christians and was heralded by more liberal ones as a theologian for the future.

J.D. Greear pastors one of the fastest growing churches in America, but his new book promises to rattle some Christians' cages.

Shifting our understanding of “salvation”: An interview with J.D. Greear

Note: Each Friday, “On Faith & Culture” will feature an exclusive interview with a Christian thought leader or a voice of importance to the American Christian community. Thirty-nine-year-old J.D. Greear pastors The Summit Church in Durham, N.C., which has been named one of the top 25 fast-growing churches in America for several years by Outreach magazine. Here Greear discusses his new book, Stop Asking Jesus Into Your Heart (B&H Publishing, February 2013), which unpacks the sticky questions of surrounding Christian salvation and the sometimes-misleading presentation of it in the church today. JM: Author and pastor David Platt drew much controversy when he called the sinner’s prayer “superstitious” and “unbiblical.” Do you agree with that perspective? JG: For what it’s worth, I think David’s words have been taken out of context.