RNS photo courtesy John Mahony

How the Lord’s Prayer saved a 9/11 survivor

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (RNS) For John Mahony, a retired U.S. Army colonel who was managing projects for Blue Cross/Blue Shield, instinct came before analysis as he fought to stay on his feet the morning of Sept. 11, 2001. By Kay Campbell. 

RNS photo by Sid Hastings/St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Concerts and controversial opera bring faiths together in St. Louis

ST. LOUIS (RNS) Terrorism stories are rarely happy stories, and yet the path Timothy O'Leary has taken — from bringing the controversial opera “The Death of Klinghoffer'' to St. Louis last year to the Sheldon's second annual Sept. 11 memorial concert this Sunday — ends with a hopeful, permanent pairing of faith and the arts in St. Louis. By Tim Townsend.

RNS photo by Enid Bloch

Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf: moving beyond the Ground Zero mosque

(RNS) Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf reflects on why America is a Shariah-compliant nation, why Islamophobia has increased in the 10 years since the 9/11 attacks, and why the turmoil over the so-called “Ground Zero mosque'' actually increased America's standing in the Muslim world. By Daniel Burke.

Minnesota and the Sinful Six

Six states has positively sinful tax policies, according to a business and law professor at the University of Alabama Law School. According to this NY Times story, Professor Susan Pace Hamill, who has a divinity degree in addition to her secular credentials, has penned a book, “As Certain as Death” that seeks to document how the 50 states, in contravention of her view of biblical injunctions, do more to burden the poor and relieve the rich than vice versa. According to the Times: Professor Hamill asserted that 18 states seriously violate biblical principles in the way they tax and spend. She calls Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas “the sinful six” because they require the poor to pay a much larger share of their income than the rich while doing little to help the poor improve their lot. The worst violator, in her view, is her own state of Alabama, which taxes its poor more than twice as heavily as its rich, while holding a tight rein on education spending.