`Early Morning Seminary’ Transcripts to Remain Public

The AP is reporting that transcripts from former Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt’s “Early Morning Seminary” meetings will remain public because a state archivist has determined they involved state business. You’ll remember that Leavitt, now the secretary of Health and Human Services, had asked that the transcripts remain sealed after a probe by the Salt Lake […]

The AP is reporting that transcripts from former Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt’s “Early Morning Seminary” meetings will remain public because a state archivist has determined they involved state business.

You’ll remember that Leavitt, now the secretary of Health and Human Services, had asked that the transcripts remain sealed after a probe by the Salt Lake Tribune.

So much for that. Has anyone seen a direct transcript? Inquiring minds want to know.

From the AP:

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) _ Transcripts of 1996 meetings involving the governor at the time discussing how to incorporate Mormon principles into policy will remain available to the public because the talks involved state business, an official said Monday.

Mike Leavitt, now U.S. secretary of health and human services, had asked the Utah State Archives to review the transcripts’ classification after they were obtained by The Salt Lake Tribune and the subject of a story Sunday.

The documents are transcripts of “Early Morning Seminary” meetings involving Leavitt, staff members and others at the governor’s mansion.

Meetings opened with a prayer, followed by stories from the Book of Mormon and discussion of how the lessons could apply to government.

Leavitt had argued that some people at the meetings expressed beliefs that were personal or “even sacred.” But archivist Patricia Smith-Mansfield said the records appear to involve state business and will remain accessible.

During one session, Leavitt and others talked about King Benjamin, who in the Book of Mormon encourages people to serve one another. Leavitt said the king’s era would be a “prime one to look at” when studying the success of civilizations.