Ferguson protests draw clergy, faith voices to streets and Twitter

In 1965, clergy joined the march on Selma for civil rights. Today, voices of faith are in the streets and on social media calling for justice in Ferguson.

Pastors, priests and rabbis joined Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (center) in the 1965 march on Selma. Now, clergy are joining protesters demanding justice in Ferguson, MO. Religion News Service file photo by Robie Ray

Pastors, priests and rabbis joined Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (center) in the 1965 march on Selma. Now, clergy are joining protesters demanding justice in Ferguson, MO. Religion News Service file photo by Robie Ray

Is Ferguson, MO, today’s Selma?

In the contentious aftermath of the death of Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager shot by police, the streets of the St. Louis suburb have been riled with demonstrators and heavily armed police. Social media has joined in concert, awash in outraged commentary at #Ferguson and #Michael Brown.

And just as 49 years ago clergy joined arms in the march on Selma for civil rights, so voices of faith are among those raised on Twitter as clergy join people flocking to the black community of the town.

Yamiche Alcindor, of USA TODAY tweets:

Twitter #NMOS14, calling for a national moment of silence, has prompted scores of communities from Hawaii to Maine to hold vigils and a moment of silence at 7 p.m. (Eastern) to honor Brown’s memory — and pray for justice in Ferguson. A New York activist who goes on Twitter as @Feministajones launched the tag and offers a link to a list of locations Louisville, Ky. pastor Kevin Smith says:

Rev. Jamal Bryant, pastor of Pastor of Empowerment Temple in Baltimore, MD., is back in Ferguson, his second trip to stand with peaceful demonstrators. He tweeted today. 

Paul Revere, an Indianapolis free lance writer was one of many who sent his prayers.

Joel MaHarry @JoelMaHarry a Califcornia brand marketer, saw the thread to Selma:

Evangelical writer Rachel Held Evans, noting the arrests of protesters and news reporters covering the protests:

Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery, in his account of being arrested Wednesday evening, mentions a clergywoman, also arrested, singing hymns as she’s driven away.