RNS Morning Report: Faith & the Democratic Debate; Survey on Slavery; Hadat Muslim Property Ban

Members of the media gather for a walk-through of the stage set-up for the first Democratic debate on June 26, 2019. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Need to know: Thursday, June 27, 2019

Debating Faith

Eclectic field could turn first Democratic debate into a faith forum

Tonight's candidates' volubility about faith matters could make the first debate a free-for-all once religion comes up. More from Religion News Service

Ongoing Impact

Slavery history still affects blacks, half of practicing Christians say in survey

Slightly more than a quarter of both practicing Christians and the general population (28%) say our society has moved past the history of slavery. More from Religion News Service

Accountability Questions

Victims question Kamala Harris’ record on clergy abuse

Survivors of clergy abuse and their attorneys complain that Harris was consistently silent on the Catholic Church's abuse scandal — first as district attorney in San Francisco and later as California's attorney general. More from Religion News Service

Sectarian Divisions

Lebanese town bans Muslims from buying, renting property

The ban only applies to Christian property — a Muslim resident or landowner of Hadat is allowed to sell or rent his property to Muslims from outside the town or to whomever he wants. More from Religion News Service

Opinion

Tony Perkins is the wrong pick to lead religious freedom efforts

While taking up USCIRF's chair position, Perkins remains president of the Family Research Council, sending emails emphasizing how his group's ‘influence is being felt in Washington, D.C. and across our nation,’ Jack Moline writes. More from Religion News Service

Unclear Future

U.S. Methodists consider what comes next after disagreements over LGBT clergy

Four months after the United Methodist Church strengthened a ban on LGBT clergy and same sex weddings, deep dissension over the move has brought the denomination closer to a formal split. More from NPR

 

 

 

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Jonathan Woodward

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