RNS Morning Report: March for Life; What The Vatican Knew; Racial Justice

Anti-abortion activists march towards the U.S. Supreme Court during the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Need to know: Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Pro-Life Politics

At March for Life, crowd cheers for anti-abortion gains — and Trump

Vice President Mike Pence made a surprise appearance at the event, striding on stage with his wife, Karen. More from Religion News Service

Viral Video

Catholic school apologizes after clip emerges of students mocking Native Americans

'They're just responding to a president that is giving license to racists and bigots who have no place in our society,' a Native American activist said. More from Religion News Service

Crisis of Confidence

Ex-deputy to Argentine bishop says Vatican knew of misdeeds

The scandal is the latest to implicate Pope Francis as he and the Catholic hierarchy as a whole face an unprecedented crisis of confidence over their mishandling of cases of clergy sexual abuse of minors and misconduct with adults. More from Religion News Service

Opinion

How can one person take us closer to racial justice? These three bywords will help

Christians must undertake courageous and urgent action to correct historic wrongs and their ongoing ramifications, writes Jemar Tisby. More from Religion News Service

Click To Pray

Pray with the Pope, from your iPhone

The pope has made earnest efforts to embrace technology, tweeting frequently and calling the Web "a gift from God." Now he's given his followers a convenient way to turn on their smart devices and see what the leader of the Catholic Church is praying for at any given time. More from NPR

Peace Process

Philippines: Muslims vote in referendum on autonomous region

Muslims in the southern Philippines are voting in a referendum on the proposed creation of an autonomous region that the government hopes will end nearly half a century of unrest and prevent a new wave of attacks by Islamic State-inspired militants. More from The Guardian

 

 

About the author

Jonathan Woodward

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