Ethics Politics

Murdered nuns laid to rest in the Congo as crime investigation continues

A street in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo town of Bukavu, where the three nuns were laid to rest. Religion News Service photo by Fredrick Nzwili
A street in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo town of Bukavu, where the three nuns were laid to rest. Religion News Service photo by Fredrick Nzwili

A street in the Democratic Republic of Congo town of Bukavu, where the three nuns were laid to rest. Religion News Service photo by Fredrick Nzwili

(RNS) Three elderly Italian nuns murdered in Burundi were laid to rest Thursday (Sept. 11) in a Xaverian cemetery in the Democratic Republic of Congo amid heightened calls for action about their death.

Sister Lucia Pulici, 75, Sister Olga Raschietti, 82, and Sister Bernadetta Boggian, 79, of the Xaverian Missionary Sisters of Mary were gruesomely murdered Sunday in their convent in the Kamenge area of Burundi’s capital, Bujumbura.

The triple murders shocked Christians across the globe and ignited calls for the protection of sisters worldwide. The nuns were reportedly beaten and killed with a knife. At least one nun was decapitated. There were conflicting reports about whether they had been raped.

While mourning their deaths, Sister Enelesi Chimbali, general secretary of the Nairobi-based Association of Consecrated Women in Eastern and Central Africa, said such women left their comfortable homes, convents and native countries to serve the poor and downtrodden.

The nuns were buried in Bukavu town in the DRC, where the order has a cemetery. The order’s district covers both Burundi and parts of neighboring DNC. The sisters had wanted to be buried in Africa according to the Xaverian order’s former regional superior, ​Sister Delia Guadagnini, to mark their love for the continent to the end.

The Team of Consecrated Women mandated by the 16th ACWECA Plenary 2014 in Lusaka, Zambia to Carry the torch of the Association for the next 3 years ( 2014 – 2017).

Photo courtesy of ACWECA

The Team of Consecrated Women mandated by the 16th ACWECA Plenary 2014 in Lusaka, Zambia to Carry the torch of the Association for the next 3 years ( 2014 – 2017).

The nuns had lived in Burundi for the last seven years, offering health care, spiritual and social support to the local communities. They had served in Africa for more than 50 years, spending most of the time in the DRC.

Thousands attended their requiem Mass on Wednesday in Bujumbura, where church officials called for thorough investigations and the truth about the deaths.

On the same day police said 33-year-old Christian Butoyi Claude, a suspect in their custody confessed, to the killings, saying the convent was built on his family’s land.

The suspect had in his possession two keys the sisters used to enter the convent and a mobile phone belonging to one of the sisters, according to the police.

But the nuns of their order are questioning the police version of events. Guadagnini said the crime was not committed by one person and the police arrest was an excuse to divert attention.

“We don’t believe in the police’s version,” Guadagnini told the Fides news agency. “We do not think this horrible crime was committed by a single person,” she said.

This is not the first killing of Catholic clergy or religious order members in the small East African country where a majority of residents are Christians.

In 2011, a Croatian nun working with an Italian charity was killed in an attempted robbery. In 1995, two Italian priests and a lay female volunteer from the Xaverian mission were killed for allegedly backing a Hutu tribe militia.

YS/AMB END NZWILI

About the author

Fredrick Nzwili

Fredrick Nzwili is a journalist based in Nairobi, Kenya. For more than 15 years, he has written about religion, politics, peace and conflict, development, security, environment and wildlife. His articles have appeared in international media organizations among others; The Tablet, The Christian Science Monitor, The National Geographic and Kenyan local newspapers; The Standard and the People Daily.

3 Comments

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  • There are no words to express the magnitude of this type of behavior—no words to share in its horror. The article says much.

    “On the same day police said 33-year-old Christian Butoyi Claude, a suspect in their custody confessed, to the killings, saying the convent was built on his family’s land.”

    Was there a legal battle going on—a domestic battle? Who gave permission for the convent to be erected? It sounds as if the order had been in operation for some time. I hope proper attention will be given to this!

    Prayers to all in these ministries.

    Peace and Love

  • “…a time is coming when anyone who kills you will think he is offering service to God”. (John 16:2).
    That is the verse from one of the Savior’s last discourses that came to mind when I read this very sad news.

    Dear Sisters in Christ, grieve but be joyful too knowing our dear Sisters are with the Spouse they served so faithfully and with great love.
    And we are commanded to pray for those who hate and persecute us, too. Remember St. Paul!

    Anyone who thinks the Faith is easy, had better think again. We must all be ready to lay down our very lives for what we believe in. It may be the 21st century, but nothing has changed since the first!

    Blessings!

  • That’s what happens when you live with animals, you get bit. There has to be an element of realism, which I’m afraid Christianity is totally devoid of, in perceiving where you are and who (or what) you are with. These people are not interested in becoming Christians, and if they seem like they are it’s just an act to please someone. Charity begins at home, so stay home.

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