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Emoji Bible makes God a smiley face with a halo

Billed as "Scripture for Millennials," all 66 books of the King James Bible, translated into emoji, went on sale Sunday (May 29) at the iTunes store as Bible Emoji.

“4 ? so ? the ?, that he gave his only begotten son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have ∞ life.” — Bible Emoji

(RNS) The Bible just got more textable.

Billed as “Scripture for Millennials,” all 66 books of the King James Bible, translated into emoji, went on sale Sunday (May 29) at the iTunes store as Bible Emoji.

It costs $2.99.

Billed as "Scripture for Millennials," all 66 books of the King James Bible, translated into emoji, went on sale Sunday (May 29) at the iTunes store as Bible Emoji.

Billed as “Scripture for Millennials,” all 66 books of the King James Bible, translated into emoji, went on sale Sunday (May 29) at the iTunes store as Bible Emoji. Screenshot courtesy of CBC news via Twitter

Its anonymous author, who represents himself or herself on Twitter, @emojiBible, as a smiley face with sunglasses, says the project took six months to complete.

“I thought if we fast forwarded 100 years in the future, an emoji bible would exist,” ? told The Guardian. “I wanted to make it similar to how you might text or tweet a bible verse, by shrinking the total character count.”

Not every single word in Bible Emoji is an emoji — most are just words.

Some of its emojis are obvious choices, such as the lightbulb emoji for “light.” Others are obvious only in context of the emoji biblical verse, such as the smiley face with the halo for God.

“4 ? so ? the ?, that he gave his only begotten son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have ∞ life.”

There is already a Bible written in tweets. In The Twible, published in 2013, RNS blogger Jana Riess wrote a tweet summarizing each of the 1,189 chapters of the Bible.

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About the author

Lauren Markoe

Lauren Markoe has been a national reporter for RNS since 2011. Previously she covered government and politics as a daily reporter at the Charlotte Observer and The State (Columbia, S.C.)

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  • Well, I guess it’s no worse than some pictorial bibles or bible story books, or even the infantalizing music and projection-screen services seen in many churches. It’s gross, but we’ve always had gross in church life.

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