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Urged by their youth, faith groups flocked to the March for Our Lives

A faith-based protester holds aloft a sign at the March for Our Lives demonstration in Washington, D.C. on March 24, 2018. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins.

WASHINGTON (RNS) — When Lydia Catterall, a junior at Norcross High School in Norcross, Ga., was asked why she was participating in the March for Our Lives demonstration to protest gun violence in the nation’s capital, she was quick to cite the tragic school shooting that left 17 people dead in Parkland, Fla., in February.

But she was just as quick to reference her faith community: Central Presbyterian Church in downtown Atlanta.

“At Central, the main theme you’ll see is acceptance — sort of trying to create a world where we can all accept each other,” Catterall said on the ride up to Washington the day before participating in the march on Saturday (March 24).

Speaking on her pastor’s phone, Catterall had to raise her voice to drown out the chatter of 10 other high-schoolers from her church youth group making the trek along with her, their pastor at the wheel. All of them were commissioned to participate in the protest during worship the weekend before.

After rattling off the list of gun control policies she’d like to see passed by Congress — background checks, raising the age limit to purchase guns and other restrictions on assault weapons — Catterall asked others to shout out the slogans on their pre-made signs.

“Nuns not guns!” one yelled, sparking laughter.

Come Saturday morning, Catterall and her friends joined a broad swath of faith groups from across the religious spectrum who participated in the Washington protest, each making the religious case for ending gun violence — often at the urging of their youth.

The March for Our Lives, a protest led by Parkland’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students and geared toward ending gun violence, drew an estimated 800,000 participants on Saturday in Washington, D.C., according to organizers. In addition, more than 800 similar demonstrations were held in cities across the globe in solidarity.

Faith groups are hardly newcomers to the gun control debate. In addition to longstanding activism on the local level, religious leaders emerged as prominent voices pushing for gun control legislation in the aftermath of the December 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in which a gunman fatally shot 20 children and six adults. At the time, then-dean of the Washington National Cathedral the Very Rev. Gary Hall proclaimed from the pulpit that “the gun lobby is no match for the cross lobby.”

Orange lights illuminate the Washington National Cathedral during a vigil for gun violence victims on March 23, 2018. The vigil was held ahead of the March for Our Lives demonstration. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins

The legacy of this faith connection was on full display Friday night, when the cathedral hosted an interfaith vigil for victims of gun violence, its archways bathed in orange light to match the featured color of the march.

In addition to prayers from Hindus, Buddhists, Sikhs and other faith leaders, the liturgy included short reflections from those touched by recent tragedies, such as a pastor who lost her mother in the 2015 Charleston church shooting that resulted in the deaths of nine black churchgoers.

April and Philip Schentrup, parents of Stoneman Douglas student Carmen Schentrup, who was killed in the shooting, also spoke. April Schentrup struggled to hold back tears as she recalled her final evening with her daughter: a dinner at their church, where Carmen served as president of her youth group.

“Prayers do not feel like enough,” April said, her voice shaking as she reflected on her grief. “We must act — we must act to change current laws that allow profound devastation and heartbreak.”

Without new laws, she said, “we are condemning more of God’s children to desolate despair and gut-wrenching tragedy.”

Later, as the crowd stood holding candles in remembrance of those who have died, Bishop Mariann Budde of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington lauded those fighting to end gun deaths.

“One day, stories will be told of the people who rose up to ensure that the scourge of gun violence will leave this land — and you are those ones,” she said. “Together, we seek the blessing of the Almighty who … sends us out now to be holy hands and feet marching for the future God prefers.”

On Saturday, faith groups showed up in force. Roughly 3,000 members of the Union for Reform Judaism — the largest Jewish denomination in the United States — gathered Saturday morning to worship and pray before joining the demonstration to “pray with their feet.” Speakers included Florida Democratic congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, organizers with the Reform Jewish Youth Movement and Stoneman Douglas students.

Attendee Charles Goodman, a 15-year-old survivor of the Parkland shooting who played basketball with one of the victims, several of whom were Jewish, cited both his harrowing experience and his faith as reasons for joining the march.

Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) addresses a gathering of Reform Jews the morning of the March for Our Lives protest in Washington, DC on March 24, 2018. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins.

“The Jewish people have a saying: thou shall not stand idly by while your neighbor’s blood is shed,” Goodman, a sophomore, said in an interview.

“My neighbor’s blood, my schoolmate’s blood, my teacher’s, my administrators’, my athletic director’s — their blood has been shed. At this point, it is up to the survivors, and those who want to help the survivors. … And it’s crucial we get the support from the Reform movement, because if we believe in our faith, then this is the right thing to do.”

Several faith leaders said their young people inspired them to take action.

The Rev. Corey Gibson, youth and young adult pastor and director of ministries at First Baptist Church Vienna, Va., said his church was sending a delegation of 35 after they were urged to do so by a high schooler in the congregation. Other young members of the historically black church joined in, making flyers, crafting social media posts and standing up during worship to encourage their fellow worshippers to participate in the march.

The message, Gibson said, was that it’s not enough “just to say these gun violence victims are in our thoughts and prayers,” but that it’s also “important that we stand up and make sure things are put in place so this cycle is not repeating.”

Christian social justice organization Sojourners also held its own rally ahead of the march, and other religious groups joined forces for the event.

The Islamic Society of North America teamed up with the Friends Committee on National Legislation (part of the Religious Society of Friends, also known as Quakers) to hold a prayer service, advocacy training and sign-making party early Saturday morning. They later joined several other religious groups in front of the United Methodist Building near the Supreme Court for a short interfaith vigil featuring members of the United Methodist Church, Disciples of Christ and others. The group held aloft signs emblazoned with slogans such as “Faith Over Firearms” and “Jesus loved the little children.”

Luqman Sabour, a young Muslim Washington resident and a survivor of gun violence, invoked a passage from the Quran to explain his activism, saying, “if you save one life, it’s as if you’ve saved mankind — the whole humanity.”

A protester holds a sign aloft at the March for Our Lives demonstration in Washington, D.C. on March 24, 2018. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins

Many worship communities participated in protests across the country in solidarity with the Washington march. In Chicago, a bevy of Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities gathered for an interfaith rally in the city’s downtown before heading to a demonstration. In Denver, Episcopalians and Lutherans gathered at Saint John’s Cathedral before walking down to the protest.

In Atlanta, Central Presbyterian Associate Pastor Michelle Hwang said the church’s middle schoolers — along with high schoolers not traveling to Washington — participated in the Georgia city’s March for Our Lives demonstration. She said the church operated a “hospitality” station offering water to participants, and later hosted a voter registration drive for 17- and 18-year-olds run by the National Coalition for Voter Justice.

“Sunday is Palm Sunday … (when) those who were oppressed were having a protest against the government — so it seems very appropriate to be participating in this protest this weekend,” Hwang said.

Faith-based efforts have largely fallen short of persuading Congress to pass robust gun control legislation, but advocates are hopeful the vibrancy and determination of a new generation may tip the scales. And if the passion of churchgoing youth such as Lydia Catterall and her cohorts at Central Presbyterian are any indication, energy around the issue is unlikely to dissipate anytime soon.

“I have been carrying an anti-gun pin on my backpack for four years now,” Catterall said. “Our whole youth group is very passionate about this.”

About the author

Jack Jenkins

Jack Jenkins is a national reporter for RNS based in Washington, covering U.S. Catholics and the intersection of religion and politics.

92 Comments

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  • As I saw elsewhere the comment “What if these kids are the answer to thoughts and prayers?”

  • That can’t be, Linda, because the horrible shooting incident that resulted in much of this protesting happened even after a lot of previous prayers.

    Give these kids the credit for their own admirable actions, not some sick sky fairy that won’t do a darn thing to help after already being asked millions upon millions of times without ever acting.

  • “Speakers included Florida Democratic congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz”

    Maybe Debbie ought to go an speak in Ram Emmanuel”s home town Chicago. Preferably south side at night, without an armed escort.

  • It is truly astonishing that all of these high school kids have the kind of money to put on such a display. Impressive. I only had a few bucks when I was in high school. To be able to hold down a good paying job ALL THE WHILE going to school is quite impressive!

  • Clearly you understand the problem – now think about the answer (Spoiler – it isn’t an arms race).

  • Bus ticket Atlanta to DC about $50. That’s less than a cheap firearm, maybe it just has something to do with what they’re spending their money on.

  • Floydee…….you are one of just a few on this Site who actually has a “thinking” brain! Thank you for……………………you.

  • Watching the speakers it seems to me that some of them are not only better equipped but they know better how to use their equipment.

  • He did act. He made sure there were no restrictions on guns just in case a good guy happened to have his gun and was able to use it when a bad guy with a gun had his and used his.

    And if he didn’t have a gun that day, oh well.

  • Yes, that is so true! Neither man, nor all his governments, has the love and the power to change this crazy world and bring real peace and security to everyone!????

    Thankfully, God and his kingdom or heavenly government (Matthew 4:17) does, and will!????☝️

    God’s government will soon replace all human governments (Daniel 2:44) and directly rule over all meek mankind after putting an end to all wicked ones (Isaiah 11:1-5) through its King (Isaiah 9:6,7), and God’s son (Matthew 3:16,17), Christ Jesus.

    There will be complete and loving brotherhood of man, no matter our race, culture or nation. There will no longer be hate, prejudice, injustice, wars nor weapons, nor will man live in constant fear, as we do today (Micah 4:3, 4).

    The rule of God’s government and the benefits of Jesus’ ransom sacrifice (Matthew 20:28) will also put an end to all sickness, disease, old age and death of the human family on earth (Revelation 21:3,4).

    Thank God that this present violent and fearful kind of life is not all there is, and that the best in blessings will soon be provided by him!???☝

  • Good for those celebrities, using their money for something for the common good. As opposed to the reality show host we have in the White House who spends money on h00kers and shell corporations to cover up payoffs.

  • So get donations to go to Washington DC to protest or grow up to be a neo-nazis.

    Choices, choices.

  • Fran, don’t start talking that “brotherhood of man” nonsense, it starts making some like Bob Arnzen squeamish.

  • If there is a racial subtext in cities like Chicago, it’s the result of an actual racial subtext.

    The NPR article relied completely on nonsense from a Michael Bloomberg propaganda front, and the Trace article is so rife with errors that it would laughable if people like yourself did not cite it.

    Canada tried to assemble a database and through the towel in when the cost zoomed to C$ 1 billion and nothing worked:

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielfisher/2013/01/22/canada-tried-registering-long-guns-and-gave-up/#3d7c9b4e5a1b

    The way other countries have gotten it to work is simply eliminating most guns, which reduces the database down to a workable size, and even then it does nothing to reduce gun crime.

  • Not sure about Soros. Mayor Bloomberg, Steven Spielberg and others have admitted to giving money. Robert Kraft of the New England Patriots donated his Corporate Jet to fly students from Florida to D.C. So……not sure about Soros, but I’ll bet it wouldn’t be hard to figure out.

  • Facts are that you are annoyed at being called racist but are not refuting the allegation in any way.

    “Play the racist card” is a rather silly argument. It does nothing to show how the label is inaccurate or false. Just that you are a snowflake about it.

  • If so, where can I sign up?

    I would love to trade in my amateur status and go pro. If I can be paid for doing what I do for free, its a good thing.

  • …THANKS FOR CLARITY AND TRUTH, FRAN!!
    …and old SATAN will be thrown into a bottomless pit for a 1000 years. LOVE WILL PREVAIL!!

  • Fran opposes any involvement of religious belief into politics and society in general.

    It is a far cry from your belief that our society must be compelled to follow your religious beliefs.

  • REREAD her article above. She speaks of a heavenly or God’s government. This is the belief of loving Christians around the WORLD,
    not “my religious beliefs.” YOU, Spuddie, are a liar and servant of the devil. BUT, you can repent if you are not too far gone.

  • Spuddie was talking about earthly politics. Jehovah’s Witnesses, like Fran, are politically neutral.

  • It doesn’t take all that much money to fly to Washington these days. Because you had only a few bucks a million years ago, doesn’t mean everyone was poor.

  • #neveragain

    Enough of your idle blathering, Benchwarmer Bob, you obese old fool.

    It’s time to act to support gun control and gun reduction. You know what you need to do, and here it is, so get your lazy backside off the couch and get on it:

    One less gun https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Hym37PqFyE

    #neveragain

  • #neveragain

    Enough of your idle blathering, Benchwarmer Bob, you obese, lazy old fool.

    It’s time to act to support gun control and gun reduction. You know what you need to do, and here it is, so get your lazy backside off the couch and get on it:

    One less gun https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Hym37PqFyE

    #neveragain

  • Yes I know what she wrote and her views.

    I know your views on the same subject are actually rather in opposition.

    Whereas Fran opposes religious groups taking any taxpayer money and entangling themselves in earthly government, you say garbage like

    “ALL pervert LGTB’s will be destroyed. CHILDREN will be adopted into decent environments, with real families.”

    Essentially God is working through government to promote HIS policy.

    Evidently being a Christian means never having to be honest with others. 🙂

  • Nothing stops you and your buddies from doing it. I am sure the NRA would love to fund it. I would love to see it.

  • NO, being a NON-Christian means never having to be honest with others. That is why you are a bald-faced liar. You serve Satan and don’t even know it. You are deceived by your own tired rhetoric.

  • Life was never safe for kids. The fact that we lacked “safe zones” reflects badly on the society we lived in – not today’s youngsters.

    Do you suppose that the fact the average 10 year old is far more capable of using a smart ‘phone than the average 70 year old means that the 10 year olds are not the “smarter” ones.

  • Speaking of racism, one black Chicago teen pointed out recently that the media has given a LOT more coverage and adoration for the Stoneman Douglas teenagers than for the black Chicago teens (who have died in much greater numbers.)

    Go figure.

  • Said the person who obviously has trouble holding themselves to their own statements and expects to attack others with impunity because they think religious belief excuses their actions.

    You can call me a liar all you want. But I am demonstrating how empty such accusations are.Have fun with that. I can’t even be bothered to take offense.

    Its sadly humorous I am just using your own words and positions against you.

    “You serve Satan and don’t even know it.”

    That is a flat out lie. I have stumped for The Satanic Temple openly and knowingly!
    Even displaying the tenets for all to see. [Be warned, the text may cause your eyes to bleed in holy distress]

    1. One should strive to act with compassion and empathy towards all creatures in accordance with reason.

    2. The struggle for justice is an ongoing and necessary pursuit that should prevail over laws and institutions.

    3. One’s body is inviolable, subject to one’s own will alone.

    4. The freedoms of others should be respected, including the freedom to
    offend. To willfully and unjustly encroach upon the freedoms of another
    is to forgo your own.

    5. Beliefs should conform to our best scientific understanding of the
    world. We should take care never to distort scientific facts to fit our
    beliefs.

    6. People are fallible. If we make a mistake, we should do our best to rectify it and resolve any harm that may have been caused.

    7. Every tenet is a guiding principle designed to inspire nobility in
    action and thought. The spirit of compassion, wisdom, and justice should
    always prevail over the written or spoken word

  • Do you support allowing legally certified & trained teachers, to have a final chance to stay alive and save their kids, using a CCW gun?

  • Like you ever show concern for such things except as a talking point to exploit.

    Conservatives like to pretend that deaths in Chicago streets somehow erases the significance of deaths in suburban schools. They also like to pretend Liberal polices created the conditions on the Chicago streets. In reality, the NRA has not only assisted in creating them, but has also capitalize on them with racist inflammatory rhetoric to stoke fears of suburban white people.

  • Why not?

    No-one needs an assault rifle for defence do they (the clue is in the word “assault”)?
    ….and what good is an assault rifle against an RPG?

  • It doesn’t work.

    Assault rifles are already regulated here and have been since 1934.

    What these folks are calling “assault rifles” aren’t.

    RPGs are also regulated heavily under the same 1934 law.

  • Question; Is this the same age bracket as the kids who were or are
    eating TIDE PODS? If so, there is no doubt they are the ones the country
    should listen.

  • Question; Are these kids in the same age bracket as the kids who were or are eating TIDE PODS? If so, there is no doubt they are the ones the country should listen. They make their parents so proud!!!

  • You appear to assume it is your God alone and no other religions shall be recognized or respected under color of law. Something which on its face lacks any kind of merit both factually and conceptually. Not only incorrect, but horribly immoral and counterproductive.

  • “In District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), however, the Supreme Court invalidated a federal law that forbade nearly all civilians from possessing handguns in the nation’s capital. A 5–4 majority ruled that the language and history of the Second Amendment showed that it protects a private right of individuals to have arms for their own defense, not a right of the states to maintain a militia.”

    Play with words all you like – they’re safer than guns – but the sorts of weapons used to commit mass murder are designed to do just that – they are no more defensive than Muhammad Ali’s right cross.

    And regulating RPG’s means what – that you can’t have one to defend yourself against the federal army (who do have them)?

    One of the downsides of a written constitution is that which this situation highlights. Weapon technology has moved on – the constitution is fossilised. Do you really believe that those who were responsible for the wording would have written it if they knew how it would be used to justify the private ownership of arms they couldn’t even imagine?

  • I just love it when folks in the Commonwealth want to play law with Americans.

    “Play with words all you like – they’re safer than guns …”.

    What “they” are “safer than guns”?

    As a matter of fact the “sorts of weapons” you claim are “used to commit mass murder” are involved in so few crimes that when the so-called “assault weapon” expired, the FBI testified it had accomplished nothing to reduce crime.

    Rifles of ALL kinds are involved in 300 homicides per year, +/- 60.

    They are truly not a problem.

    “And regulating RPG’s means what – that you can’t have one to defend yourself against the federal army (who do have them)?”

    The Second Amendment protects the right to keep and bear arms. Cannons, explosives, torpedoes, rocket-propelled grenades, and so on are ordnance.

    One of the upsides of a written constitution is that when hysterical people overreact, it prevents them from doing stupid things like the Australian gun ban.

    I believe that those who were responsible for the wording couldn’t imagine what the First Amendment has been interpreted to cover.

    There is an amendment process, and it has been used 27 times.

  • ““Play with words all you like – they’re safer than guns …”.

    What “they” are “safer than guns”?”

    Duh – words – the answer is in the bit you don’t/can’t/won’t understand.
    – – – – – –

    “The Second Amendment protects the right to keep and bear arms.” – FOR THEIR OWN DEFENSE. Omitting the bit that doesn’t suit is mendacious, immoral and definitely “unchristian”.
    – – – – –

    “doing stupid things like the Australian gun ban.” – you mean the ban that (by coincidence of course) terminated mass deaths by shooting? Stupid because it worked?
    – – – – – –

    “I believe that those who were responsible for the wording couldn’t imagine what the First Amendment has been interpreted to cover.” – Believe what you want but try believing something that is relevant if you want to be taken seriously.
    – – – – – –

    “Rifles of ALL kinds are involved in 300 homicides per year, +/- 60.

    They are truly not a problem.”

    Wow – you really think that 300 cases of murder – with the associated anguish for hundreds of parents, spouses, lovers, children, friends and colleagues plus the emotional and financial cost of the consequent processes is “not a problem”?

    Have you a clue what is meant by empathy?
    Nope?
    It doesn’t affect you so it isn’t a problem?
    It’s problems for others but that doesn’t count?

    Convince me you are not a narcissist.

  • Again, what “they” are “safer than guns”?

    If you can’t answer, just say so.

    “FOR THEIR OWN DEFENSE” doesn’t mean that you have to use arms to defend yourself. You can own arms as a hobby, to hunt, for target shooting, for ANY LAWFUL purpose.

    Here is the opinion. You might try reading it:

    http://www.bloomberglaw.com/public/document/Dist_of_Columbia_v_Heller_554_US_570_128_S_Ct_2783_171_L_Ed_2d_63

    There have been a number of mass deaths by shooting in Australia since the law was passed:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_massacres_in_Australia

    also:

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2015/10/australia-gun-control-obama-america/

    Believe what you want, but trying to palm off your personal speculation from across the sea as something more can’t be taken seriously.

    I really think that 300 cases of murder in a country of a third of a billion is not a problem. Murders, like the poor, will always be with us.

    What you’re describing is not empathy, it’s just this side of hysteria.

  • GET THEE BEHIND ME…I love and serve only my beloved Savior, JESUS CHRIST THE LORD.

  • You can’t condemn or label an entire generation over the goofy acts of some. It’s a transparent smear tactic – the same crap Breitbart, Daily Wire, Daily Caller and Fox are pulling – attack the messengers. They have a right to be heard – it affects them. In a few years many will be voting and we will have to listen to them.

  • Funny how you didn’t even acknowledge what the black Chicago teenager was saying. Didn’t even bother to express agreement or disagreement with his point. You just ignored him outright.

    Just like the big TV media outlets that he clearly exposed. Just ignoring him.

    More than one kind of racism going around these days.

  • “Why not?”

    There will be no disarmament because we have the Second Amendment that guarantees citizens the right to own guns. On this issue I find both the Left and the Right holding unreasonable positions.

  • I think this was intended as a slam at the typical response of thoughts and prayers in response to mass shootings.

  • You obviously didn’t listen to what some of those ‘kids’ said – many of whom will be voting this year. But certainly not just young folks either. Lots of adult support. If certain issues can hold sway in driving certain blocs of voters, well I guess there is a new kid on the ‘bloc’.

  • Without a link to a story its tough to take it seriously. If you have one, I promise to read it and treat it with respect. I not make any kind of snarky response to it.

  • And why not? Vietnam protests lasted approximately 10 years. That is cynicism, not optimism. And I listened to more than 1 speaker point out that to change requires a long haul approach and commitment. I am hoping they also embrace the total picture of gun violence in terms of solutions and not get sidetracked by just cosmetic fixes.

  • Change what, exactly? Polls show a bipartisan agreement on some gun control measures. The obstacle is Congress but if enough people want changes, they’ll eventually have to listen.

  • “Jehovah’s Witnesses…are politically neutral” is gibberish? No, its a factual statement on their beliefs. I am disappointed not to see a Christ-like personality shine through your comments.

  • The Pledge of Allegiance as modified in 1954. Small wonder there are kneelers at fastball games.

  • Benchwarmer Bob (AKA José), enough talk. It’s time to act to support gun
    control and gun reduction. You know what you need to do, and here it
    is, so get your lazy backside off the couch and get on it:

    One less gun https://www.youtube.com/wat

    #neveragain

  • No, Benchwarmer Bob (AKA José), enough talk. It’s time to act to support gun
    control and gun reduction. You know what you need to do, and here it
    is, so get your lazy backside off the couch and get on it:

    One less gun https://www.youtube.com/wat

    #neveragain

  • User Bob Arnzen, have you finished using the José Carioca account yet? Disqus would like to clean it up, and also your NRA financial backers won’t want you using that name suggestive of an illegal immigrant over the long term.

  • User Bob Arnzen, have you finished using the José Carioca account yet? Disqus would like to clean it up, and also your NRA financial backers won’t want you using that name suggestive of an illegal immigrant over the long term.

  • User Bob Arnzen, have you finished using the José Carioca account ? Disqus would like to clean it up, and also your NRA financial backers won’t want you using that name suggestive of an illegal immigrant over the long term.

  • Neo-nazi Bob Arnzen, have you finished using the José Carioca account yet? Disqus would like to clean it up, and also your NRA financial backers won’t want you using that name suggestive of an illegal immigrant over the long term.


  • #neveragain

    Benchwarmer Bob, enough of your blathering. Get off your lazy obese backside and start working to make gun control happen.

    Here’s what you need to do, so get on it and do something useful in your wretched life for a change:

    https://www.youtube.com/wat

    #neveragain

  • Note that the gun supporter, deluded Christian nutcase, and NRA shill
    presenting himself above in this thread as “Bob Arnzen” variously and
    dishonestly uses a variety of names on RNS such as Bob Arnzen, José
    Carioca, and others. However, there is actually no real Bob Arnzen, and
    there is no real José Carioca.

  • If only it were that simple, Doc. You know it isn’t, and the scenario you posed ignores the danger of that weapon being present all the time in the classroom.

    Your gun nuttery is notable, though.

  • Note that the gun supporter, deluded Christian nutcase, and NRA shill
    presenting himself above in this thread as “Bob Arnzen” variously and
    dishonestly uses a variety of names on RNS such as Bob Arnzen, José
    Carioca, and others. However, there is actually no real Bob Arnzen, and
    there is no real José Carioca.

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