Donate to RNS

Ahead of the Trend

Photo by Helena Lopes/Unsplash/Creative Commons

Being ‘godless’ might be good for your health, new study finds

By Bob Smietana — March 4, 2021

(RNS) — Several new studies are challenging the idea that being an atheist leads to poor health.

More Stories
Supporters of President Donald Trump overtake the inauguration stage in front of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

What Americans believe about violence against the government

By Ryan Burge — January 14, 2021

(RNS) — The relationship between partisanship and support for violence against government is clear. Church attendance does not appear to fuel the fire — nor tamp it down.

Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-California, speaks during the third day of the Democratic National Convention, on Aug. 19, 2020, at the Chase Center in Wilmington, Delaware. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

America elected a female vice president. Now will it put women in the pulpit?

By Ryan Burge — December 9, 2020

(RNS) — While women are changing the world of electoral politics, their progress in the world of religion is downright glacial.

A church service at Transformation Church in Indian Land, South Carolina, in February, 2020. Courtesy of Transformation Church

Study: Multiracial churches growing, but racial unity may be elusive

By Yonat Shimron — November 12, 2020

(RNS) — Diversity is a one-way street, the new study found. In nearly all cases, Blacks are joining mostly white congregations. Few whites join predominantly Black churches.

Courtesy of Ryan Burge

The GOP’s Catholic voter problem

By Ryan Burge — November 6, 2020

(RNS) — It’s no coincidence that three Rust Belt states with large populations of Catholics helped put the Democrats back in the White House in January of 2021.

LGBT CELEBRATION at Foundry United Methodist Church in Washington DC on in June 2013. Photo by Elvert Barnes Photography/Flickr, Creative Commons

Study finds that queer Christians quit the church twice as much as others

By Kathryn Post — November 6, 2020

(RNS) — A study in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion strongly associated queer identity with a decision to attend church less frequently or stop going altogether.

Lakewood Church is a nondenominational Christian megachurch in Houston. It is one of the largest congregations in the U.S., occupying a former sports arena. Photo courtesy of Creative Commons

Report: Megachurches continue to grow and diversify, steer clear of politics

By Bob Smietana — October 29, 2020

(RNS) — A look at megachurches over the past five years finds that most have grown larger and more diverse and become less likely to call themselves evangelical.

People protest Gov. Gary Herbert during a anti-mask rally outside of the Governors Mansion, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

How Christian nationalism may determine whether you wear a mask

By Jack Jenkins — October 9, 2020

(RNS) — Republican or Democrat, whether or not you social distance likely has more to do with whether you feel the U.S. is under threat from others not like you.

Photo by msandersmusic/Pixabay/Creative Commons

Are Democrats ‘spiritual’ and Republicans ‘religious’? It’s not that simple.

By Ryan Burge — October 6, 2020

(RNS) — A new survey suggests that the ‘God gap’ may actually be better defined as a spirituality gap. But there is plenty of room on both sides for peace, inspiration and love.

Churchgoers participate in a procession at Holy Apostles Catholic Church in Milwaukee, on Sept. 12, 2020. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)

Most congregations are doing all right during COVID-19. But the future is uncertain.

By Bob Smietana — October 1, 2020

(RNS) — A new study from the Lake Institute on faith and giving found that congregations’ giving was holding up during the pandemic, but barely half had met in person.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay/Creative Commons

Why porn’s negative personal consequences are often really about religion

By Samuel L. Perry — September 4, 2020

(RNS) — Evangelicals’ feeling about porn may well be influencing public policy as mostly red states have increasingly sought to declare pornography a ‘public health crisis.’

People raise their fists during a rally, Friday, June 5, 2020, in Las Vegas, against police brutality sparked by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on May 25. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Can churches’ focus on race move from reconciliation to justice?

By Adelle M. Banks — July 29, 2020

(RNS) — ‘The evangelical pastors that we interviewed, ultimately chose racial reconciliation as their primary frame,’ a scholar said of study of multiracial church leaders.

Page 1 of 1