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Ted Cruz hosts ‘God’s Not Dead 2’ showing at Wisconsin campaign stop

Religious liberty, as defined by conservative Christians in the film, was highlighted in the candidate's a brief speech before he watched the show.

Republican presidential candidate, Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) attends a Senate Judiciary Oversight Subcommittee hearing on
Republican presidential candidate, Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) attends a Senate Judiciary Oversight Subcommittee hearing on "Revisiting IRS Targeting: Progress of Agency Reforms and Congressional Options" on Capitol Hill in Washington on July 29, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Yuri Gripas *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-CRUZ-FAITH, originally transmitted on August 5, 2015.

Republican presidential candidate, Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

ASHWAUBENON, Wis. — Sen. Ted Cruz says he’s done caring about what Donald Trump does and instead is focused on what Wisconsin voters want.

“What the people of Wisconsin care about is jobs, bringing jobs back to America, seeing wages rise,” Cruz said ahead of the Tuesday Republican presidential primary.

“What the people of Wisconsin care about is our freedom, protecting the Bill of Rights. What the people of Wisconsin care about is safety and security, protecting this country from radical Islamic terrorism.”


RELATED STORY: 5 faith facts about Ted Cruz: It’s all about God’s work


Cruz hosted a showing of God’s Not Dead 2 at a local theater Saturday evening. The film, a sequel to a 2014 movie that was a hit with faith communities, focuses on religious liberty.

After answering questions for 15 minutes, Cruz sat down in a packed theater, popcorn and two hot dogs in-hand, to watch the show.“One simple reality, if I want to see a movie, it’s got to be a campaign stop,” Cruz joked.


“It is unfortunate to see the modern Democratic Party has gotten so extreme, so radicalized that religious liberty is now viewed in conflict with the partisan political agenda of the Democratic Party,” Cruz said.

“Every one of us has the right to live according to our faith. And this should be a shared value that brings us together.”

(Jeff Bollier originally reported this for the Green Bay, Wis. Press-Gazette)