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Latest issue of Journal of Ecumenical Studies on ‘Commemorating the Reformation’

In observance of the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s Ninety-five Theses and the start of the Protestant Reformation, the Spring 2017 issue of the Journal of Ecumenical Studies features a special section on “Commemorating the Reformation,” inspired by the North American Academy of Ecumenists (NAAE) 2016 Conference in Atlanta.

PHILADELPHIA — In observance of the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s Ninety-five Theses and the start of the Protestant Reformation, the Spring 2017 issue of the Journal of Ecumenical Studies features a special section on “Commemorating the Reformation,” inspired by the North American Academy of Ecumenists (NAAE) 2016 Conference in Atlanta.

“We are proud to (share) the presentations from this meeting, held under the theme ‘Commemorating’ the Reformation: Churches Looking Together toward 2017—and Beyond,” writes the Rev. Dr. Thomas F. Best, NAAE President, in his introduction. “These presentations, all from leaders in their respective fields and reflecting a wide range of confessional and theological perspectives, focus on the complex ecumenical task of both remembering and moving forward.”

Articles in the section include:

  • “Commemorating” the Reformation: Churches Looking Together toward 2017—and Beyond (William G. Rusch)
  • Our Ecumenical Future: Lessons to Be Learned from the Events of 1517 (John A. Radano)
  • Re-Membering for a Common Future: Lutherans and Catholics Commemorate the Reformation, 2017 (Catherine E. Clifford)
  • What Is in It for the Rest of Us? Interconfessional and Global Perspectives on the 2017 Commemoration (Robert K. Welsh)
  • Creative Remembering—and Prudent Forgetting—on Our Way to Christian Unity (Patrick Henry)

Additional content in the issue includes:

  • Where in the World Are We Going? (Leonard Swidler)
  • Hospitality in Islam as Based on Cornille’s Conditions for Constructive Interreligious Dialogue (Adis Duderija)
  • Guru Nanak’s Vision of God as a Model for Christian Ecumenism (Alonzo L. Gaskill)

For more on this issue: dialogueinstitute.org/jes-vol52. For subscription information, contact the University of Pennsylvania Press: jes.pennpress.org.

The Journal of Ecumenical Studies (J.E.S.) was founded in 1964 by Arlene and Leonard Swidler as the first peer-reviewed academic journal in the field of ecumenical and interreligious dialogue. Born out of the spirit of the Roman Catholic Church’s Second Vatican Council, J.E.S. began with an emphasis on dialogue among diverse Christian traditions. Its focus quickly broadened to Jewish-Christian dialogue and soon thereafter to interchange among a wide array of religious traditions. For more information: dialogueinstitute.org/jes.

The North American Academy of Ecumenists is a community of ecumenical scholars and activists from a wide variety of Christian traditions across North America. NAAE promotes scholarship, church life, and pastoral practice in the service of Christian unity and brings together ecumenists, theologians, liturgists, graduate students, church officials, clergy, religious, and laity actively pursuing Christian unity. For more information: naae.net.

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