Attendees of the Red Letter Revival gather to pray over Red Letter Christians leader Tony Campolo in Lynchburg, Va., on April 6, 2018. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins

At 'Red Letter Revival,' leaders give voice to evangelicals on the margins

LYNCHBURG, Va. (RNS) — When Tony Campolo began his altar call in Lynchburg, he embellished his spiritual charge in a way not often heard in evangelical services.

“Are you ready to say ‘I’m going to commit myself to Jesus,'” Campolo asked as many rose to their feet, some closing their eyes and raising their hands in prayer, “I’m going to be committed to the poor? I’m going to stand up for the refugee? I’m going to speak for those who feel oppressed by our society?”

Campolo, a leader of the Red Letter Christians advocacy group, knew his audience would appreciate that call, made Saturday (April 7) at the Red Letter Revival, a two-day gathering organized by progressive evangelical leaders near the campus of evangelical Liberty University.

In Lynchburg they aimed to fellowship, and to reaffirm their values — but also to serve as a thorn in the side of those who promote a conservative brand of their faith that has aligned itself with President Trump. (More than 80 percent of white evangelicals voted for the president.)

They organized to pray against “toxic evangelicalism,” and to offer a spiritual challenge to Liberty President Jerry Falwell Jr., whose steadfast support of Trump has drawn fierce criticism from other people of faith — and, in their view, not nearly enough evangelicals.

A different kind of evangelical political theology

Compared to other evangelical conferences that often boast larger numbers, the revival was small. Roughly 300 to 350 people crowded into the E.C. Glass High School auditorium — where Martin Luther King Jr. once spoke — Friday evening.

But those who sang and prayed over the weekend said they appreciated how the gathering was framed as an alternative to the theology of Falwell. One of the speakers, evangelical author Jonathan Martin, was escorted off Liberty’s campus by police in October while attending a concert days after calling for a peaceful protest of the school. In the months leading up to the revival, Martin referred to Falwell’s leadership style as “authoritarianism,” and the Rev. William Barber II — for many the most important leader of the religious left today — said Falwell is “justifying the GOP’s immorality” in the “same way” slaveholders used the Bible to justify slavery.

The Rev. William J. Barber II speaks at the Red Letter Revival in Lynchburg, Va., on April 6, 2018. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins


 This image is available for web and print publication. For questions, contact Sally Morrow.

Similarly, sermons and slam poems at the revival included lengthy discussions of political topics, such as sexuality, white supremacy, and mass incarceration. There were also multiple condemnations of Christian nationalism, which the Rev. Brenda Brown-Grooms, a pastor from Charlottesville, Va., declared “apostasy.”

Each speaker tied their subject back to faith.

“I came to announce tonight that I am a theological conservative,” said Barber. He chided right-wing religious leaders and their support for policies he says hurt the poor, saying, “they call themselves conservative, but they liberally resist so much of God’s character.”

Others railed against conservative pro-gun arguments.

“Some evangelicals are more committed to the amendments than the commandments,” said the Rev. David Anderson, a Maryland pastor, triggering a chorus of amens.

For many in attendance, the speaker and workshop lineup itself functioned as a de facto critique of white evangelical Protestantism, featuring voices often underrepresented in evangelical circles — women, Native Americans, African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, and LGBT people.

Lisa Sharon Harper addresses the crowd at the Red Letter Revival, which drew roughly 300 to 350 people to the E.C. Glass High School auditorium in Lynchburg, Va., on April 6, 2018. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins

Lisa Sharon Harper, who was among the faith leaders who protested white supremacists during the violent demonstrations last year in Charlottesville, said the focus on race and marginalized voices wasn’t a coincidence.

“Evangelicals continue to champion (President Trump), and the clearest manifestation of that is Jerry Falwell Jr.’s support for the president,” she said in an interview. “There is no way that we can look at his presidency and not see the manipulation of the political construct of race in order to secure the supremacy of whiteness, and that itself is an assault on the image of God.”

A strategy of “exposing injustice”

Despite the rhetoric against Falwell, author and revival organizer Shane Claiborne said the Red Letter Revival was not designed  to “vilify” him, saying “we’re not here to protest, we’re here to pro-testify!”

Campolo also drew a distinction between religious disagreement and personal attacks, noting that Jesus’ disciples often had heated disputes. He pointed to his own televised debates with Jerry Falwell Sr. — Jerry Falwell Jr.’s father — as proof that theological sparring partners can disagree respectfully.

Shane Claiborne speaks at the Red Letter Revival in Lynchburg, Va., on April 6, 2018. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins


 This image is available for web and print publication. For questions, contact Sally Morrow.

Falwell Jr. has taken a hard line with the group's leaders, but remained mostly quiet about the weekend's events. He has not replied to the group’s request for a formal debate, they say, and personally stifled efforts by the Liberty student newspaper to cover the revival, according to a student editor. Falwell did not respond to Religion News Service's request for comment but provided a statement to the local Lynchburg newspaper, The News & Advance, which was included in a story about the event.

According to Claiborne, Liberty police also sent him a letter last week threatening fines and jail time if he visited the Liberty campus to pray with students or Falwell — which Claiborne says he requested in advance.

Claiborne said these reactions were disappointing, but strengthened Red Letter Christians' argument.

Jonathan Martin speaks at the Red Letter Revival in Lynchburg, Va., on April 6, 2018. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins


 This image is available for web and print publication. For questions, contact Sally Morrow.

“What Dr. Martin Luther King talked about is that sometimes we’ve got to expose injustice so that it becomes uncomfortable,” Claiborne said, noting they ultimately hand-delivered prayers for Falwell to his brother's nearby church. “I think discomfort can be a good thing — our goal is certainly not to antagonize, not to manipulate, not to be inauthentic. But our goal is to expose some of this stuff.”

Highlighting tensions may prove to be an overarching strategy of the group, which holds little sway in more mainstream evangelical circles. Organizers say they may hold a similar gathering later this year in Dallas.

The city is home to the Rev. Robert Jeffress, a controversial pastor and religious adviser to Trump. Jeffress preached a sermon to the president entitled “When God Chooses a Leader” on Inauguration Day, and had his choir sing a song entitled “Make America Great Again” to celebrate the Fourth of July.

Reaching marginalized evangelicals

Many at the revival expressed frustration with modern evangelicalism, sometimes detailing a feeling of alienation.

“They’re placing the priority on the wrong things,” said Chris Miller, who drove 12 hours from Bluffs, Ill., with a friend to attend the event and used to work in an evangelical church.

The revival, by contrast, was widely seen as refreshing among the progressive crowd.

“I think we’re celebrating a new movement, and I’m very happy about it,” said Marianne, a Lynchburg resident who did not share her last name.

Liberty students were also present throughout the event, often sitting together in the crowd. Senior Sam Herrmann introduced Jonathan Martin, who he originally invited onto campus, on Friday evening.

Pastor Brandan Robertson, left, listens as Liberty University student Nathanial Totten, right, speaks during a "LGBTQ+ Christians and their allies" workshop at the Red Letter Revival in Lynchburg, Va., on April 6, 2018. RNS photo by Jack Jenkins


 This image is available for web and print publication. For questions, contact Sally Morrow.

The students voiced their own frustration with Falwell’s administration, which Herrmann said exhibits “toxic Christian nationalism.” Two seniors at the school — Nathanial Totten, an openly gay Liberty student who led a workshop at the revival, and Elliot Green — pointed to a specific moment in 2015 they say distanced them from Falwell: when he stood before the student body and responded to news of a terrorist shooting by reaching for a firearm he claimed to have holstered in his back pocket, suggesting students should carry guns so “we could end those Muslims before they walk in.”

“That was probably the moment that my awareness shifted to ‘this isn’t good, this isn’t okay,’” Totten said in an interview.

A new charge

Participants said it’s still too soon to say whether the revival was a success, or what success even looks like.

“Ask me in a year,” Claiborne said. “It’s not about a moment — it’s about a movement.”

Some of the movement’s contours have yet to be delineated. Preceding this weekend's event was a social media debate over whether organizers were affirming of LGBT identities and relationships. While the revival ultimately included LGBT speakers, it remains unclear whether disagreements on the topic could split the budding movement. Strategic questions, such as how far to push their activism or how to approach reticent leaders like Falwell, also remain unresolved.

But for the few hundred who came to Lynchburg to assert a different sort of evangelical activism, the Red Letter Revival offered hope.

“Too many evangelicals hold these beliefs in their heart and don’t show up,” said Lisa Sharon Harper, speaking of those who criticize Falwell and his ilk. “(But) I think people are going to show up now.”

Comments

  1. Rev. William J. Barber II’s powerful statement to the gathering, rooted in the prophetic witness of the black church:

    [Christian conservatives in the U.S.] call themselves conservative, but they liberally resist and ignore so much of God’s character. . . . Because what they do is, they say so much about what God says so little and so little about what God says so much, and that’s not conservatism. And this methodology is nothing new. It was used in slavery, which is why Frederick Douglass aaid, ‘I love the Christianity of Jesus, but I hate the Christianity of the slave master.

    And then Rev. Barber went on to note how a deliberate attempt was made from the 1930s and 1940s foward by the corporate leaders of America to buy the pulpits of its churches and silence preaching that connects the biblical message to justice. This resulted in groups like the Moral Majority and the 700 Club, he says, and the end result of this process of stifling the gospel in many churches is that now “people are fawning, fawning over a billionaire, no matter what,” because their god has become cash. Then Rev. Barber stated:

    And so it is my belief that in these shiftless ttimes, many are trying to promote a benign and anemic kind of Christianity that reduces the image of God to a mere sanctifier of our nation no matter what injustices she commits.

    As Rev. Barber concluded, the bible — which many American Christians claim to read literally, but most of which they ignore — is chock-full of divine imperatives for believers to pay attention to the weightier matters of justice and mercy — not the inessentials on which so many American Christians are now fixated (“they say so much about what God says so little and so little about what God says so much”). To underscore this point, he took as his text Micah’s summary of what the Lord demands: “To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.”

    Powerful prophetic preaching rooted in the experience and gospel witness of the black church . . . . As Jack Jenkins tweeted when Rev. Barber was preaching, you could have heard a pin drop in the auditorium — since people seldom hear this kind of proclamation of the gospel in many of their churches at this point in American history, as so-called “conservative” Christians worship at the altar of the billionaire.

  2. Hey, I’m one of those, y’know – “evangelicals on the margins”. So you’re telling me, “‘Red Letter Revival’ leaders give voice to [me]”? Why, thank you. And just how, exactly? Me see:

    (1) By the “charge” at me, “[Am I] going to be committed to the poor?” But, but, I’m “poor” myself! Next, “[Am I] going to speak for those who feel oppressed by … society?” But, but, I “feel oppressed by … society” myself!

    (2) By “serv[ing] as a thorn in the side of those who promote a conservative brand of their faith that has aligned itself with President Trump”? But, but, no thanks to you, I already am “a thorn”!

    (3) By a “gathering … framed as an alternative to the theology of Falwell”? But, but, I don’t care about his “theology”or your “alternative to [his]” or any “theology” for that matter! Don’t you know I care only about THE Christ Jesus of the gospels, epistles & revelation!

  3. “Are you ready to say ‘I’m going to commit myself to Jesus,’” Campolo asked as many rose to their feet, some closing their eyes and raising their hands in prayer, “I’m going to be committed to the poor? I’m going to stand up for the refugee? I’m going to speak for those who feel oppressed by our society?” Jesus came to die for the lost, His mandate was to make disciples of the nations. I’m sure that’s in red letters in the Bible.

  4. Yet,nothing about why Christ came to begin with – to die for our sins and restore a relationship with Him.

  5. So satan’s latest attempt to pull people away from Jesus and His truth, and this time he is using a woman “faith leader” – whatever that is:

    “Evangelicals continue to champion (President Trump), and the clearest manifestation of that is Jerry Falwell Jr.’s support for the president,” she said in an interview. “There is no way that we can look at his presidency and not see the manipulation of the political construct of race in order to secure the supremacy of whiteness, and that itself is an assault on the image of God.”
    The splitting of Christianity into pure politics – using Trump as a reason this time – and pulling aspiring Christians from Christ’s reason for dying the terrible death He died.
    Not one of this has discussed restoring a relationship between Christ and His people – the reason He died.
    Just in case you need to be reminded:
    Matthew 28

    The Great Commission
    16 Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. 17 And when they saw him they worshiped him, but some doubted. 18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in[b] the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”
    As much as liberals may want to negate that in their strive to hurt Christianity, that is why Jesus died for them.
    Christianity needs to be defended from these people who want to turn it into a political sideshow.(edit)
    Are they against “white evangelicals” because they are more interested in making disciples than slaves to satan?

  6. While more conservative in general terms than those participating in the event delineated above, nonetheless I feel the Rev. Falwell does them a disservice in his unwillingness to engage them in discussion. It is only by such engagement that people can achieve clarity on definition of terms and themes of the faith. If at the end of the discussion no common ground is discovered, then each side may go its separate way in the knowledge that a sincere effort was made by both. This I believe as Christians we are called to do, both as a witness to the World and as a justice to ourselves.

  7. Not at all! Thank you kindly — to repeat myself — for proving Reverend Barber’s point so beautifully.

    Well, and T.S. Eliot’s about the inability of many of us not to know reality if it hits us between the eyes.

    Whatever you need to tell yourself.

  8. Why do you think Christ died…..perhaps we should start there…..I’ll make it even easier for you, why do you think Christ came?

  9. As I say, thanks for proving Reverend Barber’s point beautifully.

    Why do you think Christ said we’ll be judged according to whether we responded to him in the least among us — the stranger, the sick, the imprisoned, the homeless and unclothed?

    Why do you think Christ said that the entire law is summed up by love?

    What do you think love is?

    Do you think you radiate love and good news?

  10. You didn’t answer my question. Why do you think Christ came. We’ll start there.

  11. Edward, my friend, whatever happened to Christians helping people to become disciples of Christ and teaching them everything He commanded (Matthew 28)
    This is just another attempt to pull the church out of His hands.

  12. Again, so grateful to you for confirming Rev. Barber’s point.

    Why do you think the coming of Christ was summed up as good news by his first followers?

    Why do you think Christ himself summed up the entire law as love?

    Perhaps you’d care to answer my questions? You seem confident that you have “answers.”

  13. You still avoided my question, William. Why did Christ come to the Earth?

  14. What does love look like, sandi?

    What did Christ mean when he said that his followers could be recognized and identified by their love?

    What did Christ mean when he said that his followers would be judged by at the end of their lives by the love they had shown others?

  15. Oh for crying out loud…

    “Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” John 15:13.

    That’s why He came. “For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” Matt.20:28.

    And as for judgment, it is the NATIONS that will be judged for how they treated the least of Christ’s followers that He sent to them with the gospel. There is no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. Rom. 8:1.

  16. The real issue. Take a look under the hood, look at the engine driving Falwell’s movement and discover the ultimate end game. americainbibleprophecy.org

  17. American evangelicals are neither evangelical or followers of Jesus. They are “Christian” which is the religion of the Golden Calf. They have invented and created a cowboy jesus who is an American marketing gimmick they love and serve so well. They preach a theocratic nationalism that is inherently white and redneck. They are the kapos for the servants of wealth who laugh at them all the way to the bank! They believe in a deity that requires a bloody and cruel death to assuage his ego or at least a hefty contribution to a mega “church” that like the old medieval indulgences might pay off the “debt” all descendants of two mythological beings incurred by disobeying this sky god who knew they would but created them anyway! People who actually follow Jesus of Nazareth have nothing in common with these Plantation preachers and religious salesmen and women!!!!!

  18. For me, one particularly interesting aspect of this entire Red Letter kerfluffle (no, it ain’t no revival!), is Rev. William Barber’s challenge to debate President Falwell Jr.

    I never took Falwell Sr. seriously, until he started doing public and TV debates. Just like his enemies, I thought Falwell Sr. was easy pickins. Then Falwell would smile broadly, stay all calm, and fillet his opponents like fresh panfish.

    I don’t know if Falwell Jr. is a talented debater or not. Nor Barber either.

    (Preaching talent, which Barber has, ain’t the same as debating talent. And the fact that the Red Letter gang’s biblical “contours” are still a wide-open unresolved question, would seriously work against Barber if Barber’s debate opponent has fully done his or her homework.)

  19. He was born here. He came and bothered people like David Koreah and others and broke the law. They crucified him because of it, and he died. Case closed. Then some people decided to worship him. Why, I do not know, but there are a lot of deluded people.

  20. Throughout history Christians have been the least helpful people.

  21. One will be judged for more than that, William. Did you google my question yet, or are you still avoiding it?

  22. I’m answering both your questions. They happen to have the same answer, but Sandi seems to know that while you don’t.

  23. David Koresh, fka Vernon Wayne Howell, leader of the Branch Davidian group in Waco. Tatoo is saying that Koresh, like Jesus (Koresh had messianic aspirations), came and bothered people, broke the law, etc.

  24. Unlike his father, Falwell Jr. is not a rev. He is an attorney and a university administrator, but not an ordained or even unordained minister. I first realized and confirmed this about a year ago, when in trying to defend his Lord and Savior Donald Trump, he conflated the Gospel stories of the Samaritan Woman at the Well and the Woman Caught in Adultery into one narrative.

  25. Based on the unforced error he made in the recent Erin Burnett interview (if Trump committed rape, Falwell Jr. would have to “look at the circumstances” to see if he’d continue supporting him), and his general tired demeanor, I’d say he needs practice.

  26. Thanks – I guessed that was who was meant but my knowledge of american fringe nutters is too limited to be sure I wan’t missing something.

  27. Jesus, Himself, said that He came so that we would have life, and have it in abundance. (John 10:10)

  28. Luke 4:18 “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed.”

  29. Which clearly means Falwell Jr. most likely would NOT be a good debating opponent for a talented black preacher like William Barber.

    Plus there’s a pretty good chance that Barber would play the race card somewhere during the debate (“white privilege yada yada”), and unless Falwell Jr. had a really good immediate response, Barber would score free points.

  30. Absolutely. Jesus died so we can have fellowship with God.

  31. Thank you for the correction, though confessedly I hate to be caught in what is clearly an obvious error, but that’s wounded pride talking.

  32. Well, I agree that our primary calling as Christians is witnessing, testifying, and making disciples both through the preaching of the Word and by practical acts of compassion. With so much unrest and conflict in the confessing community today, not talking past one another is very important. If we can agree on the basic fundamental theology and what the Word teaches about how to live our lives, then fighting over strategy should not be that severe an issue. If we can avoid heresy and practices that clearly contradict the Word, then coming together to discuss our plans on how to best fulfill our responsibilities is not unreasonable even when our approaches may differ. The World is not blessed by a divided argumentative body of believers who make no room for compromise on secondary and tertiary issues. Since I’m not a part of the particular conclave that is being discussed in the article, I can’t fairly speak to where they may be in error, or spot on.

  33. Your clarifying response to “Give..etc.” is excellent as usual, I shudder at the comparison of Koresh with Jesus, but then it’s not strictly your comparison, but tatoo’s.

  34. I don’t think we can truly have fellowship with God unless we make it our duty to care/advocate for the downtrodden, so I believe that this isn’t so much a “first this, then that” but more of a “all this in tandem.” The prophetic tradition (of which Jesus was a part) seems to bear this out.

  35. Jesus Himself dealt directly with the needs of those He came in contact with. Healing the sick, feeding the 5000, affirming the woman at the well. Christianity is more than words it is the actions of the Savior. They will know we are Christians by our love and will be drawn to the Savior. You would hand out a tract and witness to the homeless guy sitting in the cold before you would hand him a blanket. Thankful for us “liberal” Christians who prefer to act on our faith and draw the hearts of men to Christ.

  36. Stick first, then the carrot.
    Flog first, then tend the gashes.
    Seems like old school orphanages and modern group homes for children.

  37. She prefers the “stick” before compassion.

  38. actually Navy, we are healed by His stripes

  39. And we are drawn to the Saviour, and then we do good works because of our love for Him. I handed out tracts to everyone and if they wanted to talk, we talked. Liberal Christians have no concept of belonging to and working for Christ – they’re too busy trying to un-sin, sins

  40. One has no relationship with Christ without inviting Him into your life and following all He commanded, and allowing Him to change you. He does the work.
    You must be born again to see the Kingdom of Heaven

  41. This is what Christianity is all about:

    The Power of the Cross

    “Oh, to see the dawn
    Of the darkest day:
    Christ on the road to Calvary.
    Tried by sinful men,
    Torn and beaten, then
    Nailed to a cross of wood.

    CHORUS:
    This, the pow’r of the cross:
    Christ became sin for us;
    Took the blame, bore the wrath—
    We stand forgiven at the cross.

    Oh, to see the pain
    Written on Your face,
    Bearing the awesome weight of sin.
    Ev’ry bitter thought,
    Ev’ry evil deed
    Crowning Your bloodstained brow.

    Now the daylight flees;
    Now the ground beneath
    Quakes as its Maker bows His head.
    Curtain torn in two,
    Dead are raised to life;
    ”Finished!” the vict’ry cry.

    Oh, to see my name
    Written in the wounds,
    For through Your suffering I am free.
    Death is crushed to death;
    Life is mine to live,
    Won through Your selfless love.

    FINAL CHORUS:
    This, the pow’r of the cross:
    Son of God—slain for us.
    What a love! What a cost!
    We stand forgiven at the cross.”

    — WORDS AND MUSIC BY KEITH GETTY AND STUART TOWNEND COPYRIGHT © 2005 THANKYOU MUSIC(PRS) ADM WORLDWIDE AT CAPITOLCMGPUBLISHING.COM EXCLUSING EUROPE WHICH IS ADM BY INTEGRITYMUSIC.COM

  42. 2nd comment:
    Meridith, this is what Christianity is:

    Glory to His Name – Elisha A Hoffman

    Down at the cross where my Savior died,
    Down where for cleansing from sin I cried,
    There to my heart was the blood applied;
    Glory to His Name!

    Refrain:
    Glory to His Name,
    Glory to His Name:
    There to my heart was the blood applied;
    Glory to His Name!

    I am so wondrously saved from sin,
    Jesus so sweetly abides within,
    There at the cross where He took me in;
    Glory to His Name!

    Oh, precious fountain that saves from sin,
    I am so glad I have entered in;
    There Jesus saves me and keeps me clean;
    Glory to His Name!

    Come to this fountain so rich and sweet,
    Cast thy poor soul at the Savior’s feet;
    Plunge in today, and be made complete;
    Glory to His Name!

  43. 2nd comment:
    Kathy, they will not be drawn to the Saviour unless they know why He died on the cross for them – so they could be free from their sin – live an holy life and spend eternity with Christ. Our job is to tell them that.

  44. 2nd comment
    Our foremost role as Christians is to bring the lost to the knowledge of His salvation anything else comes after that. How much more downtrodden can one be, as to be without Christ?
    Matthew 28

    The Great Commission

    16 Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. 17 And when they saw him they worshiped him, but some doubted. 18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in[b] the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

  45. Not exactly, lots of walking wounded bearing scars from organized Christianity…no one to hold accountable for the damages either.

  46. so rather than help yourself with Christ’s word – the One we are supposed to follow anyway – you continue to berate the church and nurse your wounds…

  47. Radicalized Christians are too busy condemning those unlike them to focus on the destruction in their wake.

  48. good that you don’t condemn anyone Navy. 🙂

  49. I’m not disputing Matt. 28. I just don’t see it as first this, then that; I see it as both. Micah 6:8 – “He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the LORD require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.”

  50. Which one will never achieve without Christ in them. We only do good Meridith because Christ has changed us from within and we want to please Him.

  51. What of those Hebrews here prior to the time of Christ? Were they not able to do good because they didn’t have Christ? Micah 6:8 seems to say otherwise.

  52. My understanding is those who were looking for the Christ to come were saved. I have no scripture to substantiate that though.

Leave a Comment