marijuana
Cannabis leaf photo courtesy Shutterstock (http://shutr.bz/11iab1y)

How many Mormons use marijuana, anyway?

A guest post by Benjamin Knoll

This fall Utah voters will go the polls to vote on Proposition 2 which, if passed, would legalize medical marijuana in the state. Public opinion polls show the measure to be popular with Utah voters, despite opposition from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which wields considerable influence in Utah’s social and political culture.

While formally opposing the ballot initiative, the Church has recently announced that it does not formally object to the use of marijuana in select medical cases per se. It has asked the Utah State legislature to legalize medical marijuana while remaining opposed to legalization by popular vote.

The Church has also recently announced that the use of marijuana recreationally would violate the Word of Wisdom, the Church’s dietary law, and thus disqualify a member from being able to hold a recommend to enter church temples.

Lost in much of the conversation about Proposition 2 is how prevalent marijuana use is among Latter-day Saints. How might the legalization of medical marijuana affect Mormons’ likelihood to use it?

The 2016 Next Mormons Survey asked both current and former Mormons whether they had used marijuana sometime in the last six months. (See here for more about the survey’s sample size and methodology.)

At that time, about one in ten (9.5%) self-identified Mormons in the United States said “yes.” Those more likely to have used marijuana included:

  • Younger people (17% of Millennials compared to 7% of GenXers and 4% of the combined Baby Boomer/Silent generation).
  • Men (14% of men compared to 6% of women).
  • Poorer members (12% of those who earn less than $50K/year compared to 8% among those who earn over $100K/year).
  • Those with less formal education (12% of those without a college degree compared to 6% of those who have earned a college degree).
  • Racial minorities (14% of nonwhite Mormons compared to 9% of white Mormons).
  • Those who are less active in the Church. Only about 7% of those who attend church at least once a month said that they had used it in the last six months compared to one in five (20%) of those who attend only sporadically or never.

Further analysis shows that the legal status of marijuana in the state where the respondent lived in 2016 made almost no difference. About 11% of those who lived in states where it was either medically or recreationally legal in 2016 said that they had used marijuana recently, compared to 9% in the states where it was illegal, a statistically insignificant difference.

This pattern did not change much even among frequent church attenders, where usage was 8% in recreational states, 9% in medical states, and 7% in illegal states. This non-effect held even after statistically controlling for other demographic factors. Frequency of church attendance emerged as the single strongest predictor of marijuana use when controlling for these factors, regardless of marijuana’s legality in the state where the survey respondent lived.

For their part, roughly one in five people (18%) who self-identified as a former Mormon in our survey report that they’ve used marijuana in the last six months. This figure remains constant regardless of whether they live in a state where it’s legal (either recreationally or medically) or illegal.

Overall, the legal status of marijuana does not seem to affect whether American Mormons and former Mormons choose to use it. Usage rates are about the same whether they live in states where it is legal (whether for recreational or medical reasons) or illegal.

Thus, whatever Utah voters or the state legislature choose to do regarding Proposition 2 and medical marijuana this fall, it will likely not drastically affect usage rates among Utah Mormons.

 


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Benjamin Knoll is the John Marshall Harlan Associate Professor of Politics at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky. He is the co-author, with Cammie Jo Bolin, of She Preached the Word: Women’s Ordination in Modern America, which is now available from Oxford University Press.

Comments

  1. Why does it matter how many mormons use marijuana. If even ONE Mormon wants to use marijuana, a religion that declares its belief in agency, and a religio-political party that declares its interests in personal freedom, ought to support it.

  2. That’s a facile view of agency. Agency is the ability to choose, not an amoral view that anything goes.

  3. I have yet to see how using a natural occurring Botanical is immoral.

  4. How in the world is the fact that it is “a natural occurring botanical” have any bearing on the morality?

  5. The immorality of it is in the intentional use of mind-altering drugs for recreational purposes, which distorts one’s perception of reality, abuses the body, distracts from more productive endeavors, and, in some cases, unnecessarily risks triggering psychosis (in young people). It’s fine if you don’t have a problem with it; if that’s the case go vote for legalization wherever you live.

  6. I have and I do. I was also in law enforcement for many years.

    Funny how the mormons don’t ban alcohol or the many mind and body altering drugs obtainable from a doctor simply by saying “owwww!”

  7. Funny how every non-Mormon in Utah (other than you, if you happen to be in Utah) seems to believe that’s exactly what the Church has done for decades…

  8. This comment appears to have a typing error that makes it incoherent, so I’m trying to guess at what you’re saying. All I can say is that many look at Utah’s strict alcohol laws (state liquor stores, can’t sell alcohol in grocery stores, the “Zion curtain) and argue that the Church has tried to effectively ban alcohol in Utah.

  9. Because politically, it can’t. You have to be joking with this line of argument.

  10. The only Mormons I’ve ever known who were frequent users of dope at one time or another in their lives were brain damaged by their bonging habit- they truly couldn’t reason things out anymore and I’m kind of glad I don’t have to deal with them in any ongoing way anymore as it became burdensome communicating with them and their ongoing yearning for more dope, even though they said they’d quit.

    I don’t know if you remember that movie a few years back where umm, adam sandler marries a woman who has short term recall only, so every day he deals with her not knowing who he is- 50 first dates? Anyway, that is sort of how long term dopers are but the key difference is that dopers can’t think past a certain point- a clever mind takes info and processes it to come up with conclusions that are further processed leading to new questions and new answers which are further tested and pulled apart but with stoners, well, they can’t process past a few steps without being pulled back to the original info as though it is a pit that has trapped their feeble mind.

    I’ve seen this many times with 2 individuals who were brain damaged (and one of them even admitted it while lamenting that he wish he had a “do-over life”) from their long term dope use. There has never been a wise bonghead. Doesn’t surprise me one bit that Ben in Oakland is all for dope.

  11. Medical marijuana is not “dope”. By calling it that, you only make it that much easier for everyone to see your ignorance, along with the anger and resentment you hold towards this all natural medicinal plant and sick patients in pain who choose rely on it for relief.

    If anything, you can say that deadly highly addictive, toxic, narcotic pain pills and booze are the real “dope”. Because they make people do the dumbest things, often become violent, and then blackout and not remember all the havoc caused by the narcotic pain pills and booze, like true “dopes”

    Go ask your local street drug dealer for some “dope”.

    You’re not going to get medical marijuana, guaranteed!

    Anecdotal “Horror Stories” coming from vehemently vocal anti-medical marijuana types carry little weight.

    Such “Horror Stories” and scare-tactics don’t frighten, fool, nor convince anybody who has at least half a brain and has their very own internet access with Google.

    Just saying…

    There is absolutely no denying that the vast majority of Americans support providing full, safe, legal access to Medical Marijuana Nationwide.

    The prohibitionist view on medical marijuana is the viewpoint of a minority and rapidly shrinking percentage of Americans. It is based upon decades of lies and propaganda.

    Each and every tired old lie they have propagated has been thoroughly proven false by both science and society.

    Their tired old rhetoric no longer holds any validity. The vast majority of Americans have seen through the sham of medical marijuana prohibition in this day and age. The number of prohibitionists left shrinks on a daily basis.

    With their credibility shattered, and their not so hidden agendas visible to a much wiser public, what’s left for a medical marijuana prohibitionist to do?

    Maybe, just come to terms with the fact that Medical Marijuana Legalization Nationwide is an inevitable reality that’s approaching much sooner than prohibitionists think, and there is nothing they can do to stop it!

    Legalize Nationwide!…and Support All Medical Marijuana Legalization Efforts!.

  12. Zampon,

    What we certainly don’t need are anymore people who feel justified in appointing themselves to be self-deputized morality police.

    Very sick patients with serious, debilitating, often life threatening illnesses in agonizing pain along with their very own doctor’s consent and approval are very capable of deciding for themselves if medical marijuana could be beneficial to their medical condition and improve their quality of life with the limited time they may have left to live.

    Medical marijuana remains a far less dangerous choice over popping daily handfuls of deadly, highly addictive, toxic, expensive man made narcotic pain pills and other pharmaceuticals with tons of horrible, nasty side effects. Up to and including death.

    Furthermore, we definitely don’t need anyone dictating how our loved ones (sick patients in agonizing pain) should choose to medicate. Especially, when they have their very own doctors consent, approval and blessings.

    We can’t just lock up everyone who medicates in ways prohibitionists don’t personally approve of.

    When a loved one is in pain, wasting away unable to eat, and needs this marvelous herb in order to increase their appetite, reduce the overwhelming pain, and live as as healthy and happily as they can with the time they have left, let’s have the compassion to allow them to have it.

    Stop treating Medical Marijuana Patients like second rate citizens and common criminals by forcing them to the dangerous black market for their medicine.

    Risking incarceration to obtain the medicine you need is no way to be forced to live.

    Support Medical Marijuana Now!

    “[A] federal policy that prohibits physicians from alleviating suffering by prescribing marijuana for seriously ill patients is misguided, heavy-handed, and inhumane.” — Dr. Jerome Kassirer, “Federal Foolishness and Marijuana,” editorial, New England Journal of Medicine, January 30, 1997

    “[M]arijuana has an extremely wide acute margin of safety for use under medical supervision and cannot cause lethal reactions … [G]reater harm is caused by the legal consequences of its prohibition than possible risks of medicinal use.” — American Public Health Association, Resolution #9513, “Access to Therapeutic Marijuana/Cannabis,” 1995

    “The National Nurses Society on Addictions urges the federal government to remove marijuana from the Schedule I category immediately, and make it available for physicians to prescribe. NNSA urges the American Nurses’ Association and other health care professional organizations to support patient access to this medicine.” — National Nurses Society on Addictions, May 1, 1995

    “When appropriately prescribed and monitored, marijuana/cannabis can provide immeasurable benefits for the health and well-being of our patients … We support state and federal legislation not only to remove criminal penalties associated with medical marijuana, but further to exclude marijuana/cannabis from classification as a Schedule I drug.” — American Academy of HIV Medicine, letter to New York Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, November 11, 2003

    “[The AAFP accepts the use of medical marijuana] under medical supervision and control for specific medical indications.” — American Academy of Family Physicians, 1989, reaffirmed in 2001

    “[We] recommend … allow[ing] [marijuana] prescription where medically appropriate.” — National Association for Public Health Policy, November 15, 1998

    “Therefore be it resolved that the American Nurses Association will: — Support the right of patients to have safe access to therapeutic marijuana/cannabis under appropriate prescriber supervision.” — American Nurses Association, resolution, 2003

  13. Nobody can deny the Medical effectiveness of Medical Marijuana.

    Below is a list of just a few of the many Professional Medical Organizations Worldwide that attest to Medical Marijuana’s effectiveness and Support Legal Access to and Use of Medical Marijuana.

    Along with thirty U.S states that have already legalized medical marijuana.

    Are they ALL wrong?

    tfried, November 11, 2003

    International and National Organizations

    AIDS Action Council
    AIDS Treatment News
    American Academy of Family Physicians
    American Medical Student Association
    American Nurses Association
    American Preventive Medical Association
    American Public Health Association
    American Society of Addiction Medicine
    Arthritis Research Campaign (United Kingdom)
    Australian Medical Association (New South Wales) Limited
    Australian National Task Force on Cannabis
    Belgian Ministry of Health
    British House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology
    British House of Lords Select Committee On Science and Technology (Second Report)
    British Medical Association
    Canadian AIDS Society
    Canadian Special Senate Committee on Illegal Drugs
    Dr. Dean Edell (surgeon and nationally syndicated radio host)
    French Ministry of Health
    Health Canada
    Kaiser Permanente
    Lymphoma Foundation of America
    The Montel Williams MS Foundation
    Multiple Sclerosis Society (Canada)
    The Multiple Sclerosis Society (United Kingdom)
    National Academy of Sciences Institute Of Medicine (IOM)
    National Association for Public Health Policy
    National Nurses Society on Addictions
    Netherlands Ministry of Health
    New England Journal of Medicine
    New South Wales (Australia) Parliamentary Working Party on the Use of Cannabis for Medical Purposes
    Dr. Andrew Weil (nationally recognized professor of internal medicine and founder of the National Integrative Medicine Council)

    State and Local Organizations

    Alaska Nurses Association
    Being Alive: People With HIV/AIDS Action Committee (San Diego, CA)
    California Academy of Family Physicians
    California Nurses Association
    California Pharmacists Association
    Colorado Nurses Association
    Connecticut Nurses Association
    Florida Governor’s Red Ribbon Panel on AIDS
    Florida Medical Association
    Hawaii Nurses Association
    Illinois Nurses Association
    Life Extension Foundation
    Medical Society of the State of New York
    Mississippi Nurses Association
    New Jersey State Nurses Association
    New Mexico Medical Society
    New Mexico Nurses Association
    New York County Medical Society
    New York State Nurses Association
    North Carolina Nurses Association
    Rhode Island Medical Society
    Rhode Island State Nurses Association
    San Francisco Mayor’s Summit on AIDS and HIV
    San Francisco Medical Society
    Vermont Medical Marijuana Study Committee
    Virginia Nurses Association
    Whitman-Walker Clinic (Washington, DC)
    Wisconsin Nurses Association

    Additional AIDS Organizations

    The following organizations are signatories to a February 17, 1999 letter to the US Department of Health petitioning the federal government to “make marijuana legally available … to people living with AIDS.”

    AIDS Action Council
    AIDS Foundation of Chicago
    AIDS National Interfaith Network (Washington, DC)
    AIDS Project Arizona
    AIDS Project Los Angeles
    Being Alive: People with HIV/AIDS Action Committee (San Diego, CA)
    Boulder County AIDS Project (Boulder, CO)
    Colorado AIDS Project
    Center for AIDS Services (Oakland, CA)
    Health Force: Women and Men Against AIDS (New York, NY)
    Latino Commission on AIDS
    Mobilization Against AIDS (San Francisco, CA)
    Mothers Voices to End AIDS (New York, NY)
    National Latina/o Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual And Transgender Association
    National Native American AIDS Prevention Center
    Northwest AIDS Foundation
    People of Color Against AIDS Network (Seattle, WA)
    San Francisco AIDS Foundation
    Whitman-Walker Clinic (Washington, DC)

    Other Health Organizations

    The following organizations are signatories to a June 2001 letter to the US Department of Health petitioning the federal government to “allow people suffering from serious illnesses … to apply to the federal government for special permission to use marijuana to treat their symptoms.”

    Addiction Treatment Alternatives
    AIDS Treatment Initiatives (Atlanta, GA)
    American Public Health Association
    American Preventive Medical Association
    Bay Area Physicians for Human Rights (San Francisco, CA)
    California Legislative Council for Older Americans
    California Nurses Association
    California Pharmacists Association
    Embrace Life (Santa Cruz, CA)
    Gay and Lesbian Medical Association
    Hawaii Nurses Association
    Hepatitis C Action and Advisory Coalition
    Life Extension Foundation
    Maine AIDS Alliance
    Minnesota Nurses Association
    Mississippi Nurses Association
    National Association of People with AIDS
    National Association for Public Health Policy
    National Women’s Health Network
    Nebraska AIDS Project
    New Mexico Nurses Association
    New York City AIDS Housing Network
    New York State Nurses Association Ohio Patient Network Okaloosa AIDS Support and Information Services (Fort Walton, FL)
    Physicians for Social Responsibility – Oregon
    San Francisco AIDS Foundation
    Virginia Nurses Association
    Wisconsin Nurses Association

    Health Organizations Supporting Medical Marijuana Research

    International and National Organizations

    American Cancer Society
    American Medical Association
    British Medical Journal
    California Medical Association
    California Society on Addiction Medicine
    Congress of Nursing Practice
    Gay and Lesbian Medical Association
    Jamaican National Commission on Ganja
    National Institutes of Health (NIH) Workshop on the Medical Utility of Marijuana
    Texas Medical Association
    Vermont Medical Society
    Wisconsin State Medical Society

  14. There is absolutely no denying that the vast majority of Americans support providing full, safe, legal access to Medical Marijuana Nationwide.

    Pennsylvania: Franklin & Marshall College
    A record number of Pennsylvania voters, 84 percent, favor legalizing medical marijuana for adults if a doctor recommends it.

    Harris Poll
    Eighty-one percent of respondents, including super-majorities ofDemocrats, Republicans, and Independents, expressed support forlegalizing marijuana for medical treatment.

    Virginia: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Fifty-four percent of voters support “allowing adults to legally
    possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use.” Nearly nine out of ten Virginians support legalizing the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes.

    Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Voters in three critical swing states support legalization and
    super-majorities in all three states endorse allowing doctors to
    recommend cannabis therapy.

    Pennsylvania: Robert Morris University
    The survey showed 67.5 percent of Pennsylvanians are in favor of legalizing medical marijuana.

    Iowa: Des Moines Register Poll
    Seventy percent of Iowa adults say they favor legalizing marijuana for medical uses.

    North Carolina: Public Policy Polling
    Nearly seven out of ten North Carolinians support a doctor’s right to prescribe marijuana to patients in need.

    Third Way
    Fifty percent support legalizing recreational marijuana for use by adults; 78% are in favor of allowing individuals to use marijuana for medical purposes if a doctor recommends it.

    Florida: Gravis Marketing Poll
    More than 60 percent of Florida voters say that they support Amendment 2, a proposed constitutional amendment to permit cannabis therapy to qualified patients.

    Florida: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Fifty-five percent of voters support allowing adults in Florida to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use.

    Connecticut: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Nine out of ten Connecticut voters support legalizing the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes, and a majority support allowing adults to possess the plant for any purpose.

    Minnesota: KSTP/SurveyUSA Poll
    Sixty-eight percent of Minnesotans believe marijuana should be legal for medical purposes.

    WebMD Survey of Doctors
    A majority of doctors say that medical marijuana should be legalized nationally and that it can deliver real benefits to patients.

    Virginia: Quinnipiac University
    Virginia Voters Back Medical Marijuana with 84% support.

    Iowa: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Iowans overwhelmingly support allowing doctors to prescribe marijuana for medical use.

    Maryland: Goucher Poll
    Ninety percent of Marylanders support the use of marijuana for medical purposes, if prescribed by a doctor.

    Pennsylvania: Mercyhurst Center for Applied Politics Poll
    A strong majority (85%) of Pennsylvania voters say that patients should be allowed to use marijuana when prescribed by a doctor.

    Ohio: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Eighty-seven percent of Ohio voters support the use of medical marijuana.

    New York: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Voters in New York support the legalization of marijuana for both medical (88%) and personal (57%) use.

    North Carolina: Public Policy Polling
    A recent Public Policy Polling survey found 63 percent of North Carolina voters believe doctors should have the right to prescribe marijuana for medical use.

    Florida: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Eighty-two percent of Florida voters support the medicinal use of marijuana.

    Oklahoma: SoonerPoll
    Seventy-one percent support allowing seriously ill patients to possess marijuana for medical purposes with a physician’s recommendation.

    Fox News Poll
    Eighty-five percent of voters favor medical marijuana.

  15. Fear of Medical Marijuana Legalization is unfounded. Not based on any science or fact whatsoever.

    So please all prohibitionists, we beg you to give your scare tactics, “Conspiracy Theories” and “Doomsday Scenarios” over the inevitable Legalization of Medical Marijuana Nationwide a rest. Nobody is buying them anymore these days. Okay?

    Furthermore, if all prohibitionists get when they look into that nice, big and shiny crystal ball of theirs, while wondering about the future of Medical Marijuana Legalization Nationwide, is horror, doom, and despair, well then I suggest they return that thing as quickly as possible and reclaim the money they shelled out for it, since it’s obviously defective.

    The prohibition of marijuana has not decreased the supply nor the demand for medical marijuana at all. Not one single iota, and it never will. Just a huge and complete waste of our tax dollars to continue criminalizing sick patients and senior citizens in pain for choosing a natural, non-toxic, relatively benign plant proven to be much safer than popping daily handfuls of deadly, toxic, man-made, highly addictive, narcotic pain pills and other pharmaceuticals.

    If prohibitionists are going to take it upon themselves to worry about “saving us all” from ourselves, then they need to start with the drug that causes more death and destruction than every other drug in the world COMBINED, which is alcohol!

    Why do prohibitionists feel the continued need to vilify and demonize marijuana when they could more wisely focus their efforts on a real, proven killer, alcohol, which again causes more destruction, violence, and death than all other drugs, COMBINED?

    Prohibitionists really should get their priorities straight and or practice a little live and let live. They’ll live longer, happier, and healthier, with a lot less stress if they refrain from being bent on trying to control others through Draconian Marijuana Laws.

  16. yawn,

    What a long-winded load of steaming crap from a dope addict.

  17. Only dopes refer to medical marijuana as “dope”.

    Just saying…

    Next?

    Try this one on for size:

    Fear of Medical Marijuana Legalization is unfounded. Not based on any science or fact whatsoever.

    So please all prohibitionists, we beg you to give your scare tactics, “Conspiracy Theories” and “Doomsday Scenarios” over the inevitable Legalization of Medical Marijuana Nationwide a rest. Nobody is buying them anymore these days. Okay?

    Furthermore, if all prohibitionists get when they look into that nice, big and shiny crystal ball of theirs, while wondering about the future of Medical Marijuana Legalization Nationwide, is horror, doom, and despair, well then I suggest they return that thing as quickly as possible and reclaim the money they shelled out for it, since it’s obviously defective.

    The prohibition of marijuana has not decreased the supply nor the demand for medical marijuana at all. Not one single iota, and it never will. Just a huge and complete waste of our tax dollars to continue criminalizing sick patients and senior citizens in pain for choosing a natural, non-toxic, relatively benign plant proven to be much safer than popping daily handfuls of deadly, toxic, man-made, highly addictive, narcotic pain pills and other pharmaceuticals.

    If prohibitionists are going to take it upon themselves to worry about “saving us all” from ourselves, then they need to start with the drug that causes more death and destruction than every other drug in the world COMBINED, which is alcohol!

    Why do prohibitionists feel the continued need to vilify and demonize marijuana when they could more wisely focus their efforts on a real, proven killer, alcohol, which again causes more destruction, violence, and death than all other drugs, COMBINED?

    Prohibitionists really should get their priorities straight and or practice a little live and let live. They’ll live longer, happier, and healthier, with a lot less stress if they refrain from being bent on trying to control others through Draconian Marijuana Laws.

  18. Speaking of morals and sins, prohibitionists often ask: “How do you know medical marijuana is a gift from God?”

    This is how we know:

    Genesis 1:29 – And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which [is] upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which [is] the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat.

    Genesis 9:3 – Every moving thing that liveth shall be meat for you; even as the green herb have I given you all things.

    Genesis 1:11 – And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, [and] the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed [is] in itself, upon the earth: and it was so.

    Genesis 1:30 – And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein [there is] life, [I have given] every green herb for meat: and it was so.

    Proverbs 15:17 – Better [is] a dinner of herbs where love is, than a stalled ox and hatred therewith.

  19. ha ha ha, only a deluded bonghead could believe that his ranting would change the mind of a conservative member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

    If anything, after reading your delusions I am more inclined to vote for the party that wants tougher sentencing on bongheads who break the law.

  20. I would never be so naive to believe that I’m going to change your mind with my comments. We all know your mind is closed shut and tight. Your name calling and stereotyping along with your very obvious anger, resentment and bitterness towards medical marijuana says it all.

    I respond merely to keep the public and undecided readers of this forum informed.

    For you to even think that I’m trying to change your closed mind deserves a big “ha ha ha” right back at you.

    Obviously, you are the “deluded” one.

    Face it:

    Medical Marijuana Legalization Nationwide is an inevitable reality that’s approaching much sooner than prohibitionists think and there is nothing they can do to stop it!

    Legalize Medical Marijuana Nationwide!

    There is absolutely no denying that the vast majority of Americans support providing full, safe, legal access to Medical Marijuana Nationwide.

    Pennsylvania: Franklin & Marshall College
    A record number of Pennsylvania voters, 84 percent, favor legalizing medical marijuana for adults if a doctor recommends it.

    Harris Poll
    Eighty-one percent of respondents, including super-majorities of Democrats, Republicans, and Independents, expressed support for legalizing marijuana for medical treatment.

    Virginia: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Fifty-four percent of voters support “allowing adults to legally
    possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use.” Nearly nine out of ten Virginians support legalizing the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes.

    Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Voters in three critical swing states support legalization and
    super-majorities in all three states endorse allowing doctors to
    recommend cannabis therapy.

    Pennsylvania: Robert Morris University
    The survey showed 67.5 percent of Pennsylvanians are in favor of legalizing medical marijuana.

    Iowa: Des Moines Register Poll
    Seventy percent of Iowa adults say they favor legalizing marijuana for medical uses.

    North Carolina: Public Policy Polling
    Nearly seven out of ten North Carolinians support a doctor’s right to prescribe marijuana to patients in need.

    Third Way
    Fifty percent support legalizing recreational marijuana for use by adults; 78% are in favor of allowing individuals to use marijuana for medical purposes if a doctor recommends it.

    Florida: Gravis Marketing Poll
    More than 60 percent of Florida voters say that they support Amendment 2, a proposed constitutional amendment to permit cannabis therapy to qualified patients.

    Florida: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Fifty-five percent of voters support allowing adults in Florida to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use.

    Connecticut: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Nine out of ten Connecticut voters support legalizing the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes, and a majority support allowing adults to possess the plant for any purpose.

    Minnesota: KSTP/SurveyUSA Poll
    Sixty-eight percent of Minnesotans believe marijuana should be legal for medical purposes.

    WebMD Survey of Doctors
    A majority of doctors say that medical marijuana should be legalized nationally and that it can deliver real benefits to patients.

    Virginia: Quinnipiac University
    Virginia Voters Back Medical Marijuana with 84% support.

    Iowa: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Iowans overwhelmingly support allowing doctors to prescribe marijuana for medical use.

    Maryland: Goucher Poll
    Ninety percent of Marylanders support the use of marijuana for medical purposes, if prescribed by a doctor.

    Pennsylvania: Mercyhurst Center for Applied Politics Poll
    A strong majority (85%) of Pennsylvania voters say that patients should be allowed to use marijuana when prescribed by a doctor.

    Ohio: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Eighty-seven percent of Ohio voters support the use of medical marijuana.

    New York: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Voters in New York support the legalization of marijuana for both medical (88%) and personal (57%) use.

    North Carolina: Public Policy Polling
    A recent Public Policy Polling survey found 63 percent of North Carolina voters believe doctors should have the right to prescribe marijuana for medical use.

    Florida: Quinnipiac University Poll
    Eighty-two percent of Florida voters support the medicinal use of marijuana.

    Oklahoma: SoonerPoll
    Seventy-one percent support allowing seriously ill patients to possess marijuana for medical purposes with a physician’s recommendation.

    Fox News Poll
    Eighty-five percent of voters favor medical marijuana.

  21. In Reply to: “Hemlock is also a green herb.”

    True, but there has never ever been a single death proven to have been caused directly and solely due to marijuana consumption alone in all human history.

    Can you say the same about Hemlock?

    Next?

    *yawns*

  22. I (and the Church, as of recently) support medical marijuana. The difference is how it is administered. It should be treated like any other medicine with potentially powerful side effects: requiring a prescription from a doctor, at a specific dosage, in a form that ‘IMO,Ives chances for abuse.

  23. So the threshold for safety is that if it does anything less than directly cause death with no intervening factors, then it’s all good? So an accident caused by a high machinery operator is fine, or psychosis induced by marijuana use is fine?

    Keep moving those goal posts, buddy.

  24. The goal post is in the same spot. It never moved. If anything, you are attempting to move it right now, “buddy”…

    Again: There has never ever been a single death in all documented human history where a coroner or any other credible medical professional has declared that marijuana consumption alone was the direct and sole cause of death.

    Never ever.

    In reply to your concern about a possible “accident caused by a high machinery operator”

    Infinitely more workers end up impaired at work, calling out of work or in a stupor because of perfectly legal and far more deadly prescription medications and alcohol than medical marijuana.

    Why doesn’t prescription medications and alcohol concern you much more than relatively benign medical marijuana? It should.

    I mean hey, let’s face reality here: Infinitely more deadly accidents are caused by “high machinery operators” that are impaired on perfectly legal prescription medications and drunk on perfectly legal widely accepted, endlessly advertised and even glorified as an All American pastime, alcohol.

    Those types of deaths occur probably on a daily basis and are often proven to have been induced by prescription medications and alcohol.

    Why don’t those real, proven deaths that happen on the daily worry you much more than the mere “possibility” of perhaps one such death maybe occuring someday and then possibly become proven to have been caused by medical marijuana?

    Those infinitely more numerous deaths proven to have been caused by prescription medications and alcohol just about everyday should worry you much more than the “possibility” of one caused by medical marijuana.

    Protesting the legality of prescription pain medications and alcohol should be your number one priority if you are truly oh so worried about ” high machinery operator is fine, or psychosis induced” deaths.

    Just saying….

    Get your priorities in order. Why don’t you?

  25. Again, your “death directly caused by marijuana alone” standard is not a good standard. Workers causing death through impairment from alcohol and other substances is an argument for tighter regulations of those substances–not for looser regulations of marijuana. By the way, I fully support tighter regulations on alcohol, opiates, and other drugs known to cause impairment and harm.

    Your argument rests on the assumption that I’m ok with alcohol regulations as they are. I’m not.

    [Edit: Tangentially, are you really so desperate for approval that you have to upvote your own comments? Wow.]

  26. Zampona, In Reply to: “Workers causing death through impairment from alcohol and other substances is an argument for tighter regulations of those substances–not for looser regulations of marijuana. By the way, I fully support tighter regulations on alcohol, opiates, and other drugs known to cause impairment and harm.”

    Yeah right, Sure you do…

    Okay then. Please prove to all of us readers here right now that you aren’t just paying brief lip service about your support tighter regulations for prescription medications and alcohol only to now try to bolster your irrational anti-medical marijuana sentiment. Okay, sound fair and reasonable?

    You can prove that by linking us to all your previous online commentary that you have made expressing equal, if not far greater concern over prescription medication and alcohol regulations needing to be stricter. Link us now please.

    We’ll wait….
    (and wait…and wait… and wait…ZZZ..ZZz…Zzz…zzz…z..z.z )

    What’s that you say? You mean to tell us that you never, ever, not even once in your entire lifetime got online anywhere and posted comments expressing at least equal, if not far greater concern over tightening the regulations for prescription medications and alcohol? Not once? Not even one comment ever in your entire lifetime that you can direct us to, huh?

    Well then, that makes you an hypocrite.

    Obviously applying an unfair double standard to far less dangerous, far less deadly medical marijuana that you don’t apply equally to far more dangerous and deadly prescription medications and alcohol. Which both cause cause of infinitely more deaths and workplace accidents every single day than medical marijuana ever has and ever will.

    *yawns*

    Next?

  27. Your request is unreasonable, since opportunities to discuss marijuana regulations are much more plentiful online right now than alcohol regulations. I think you know that, but I’ll bet you didn’t think I would call your bluff.

    Here are links to discussions where I argued in support of lowering the legal blood alcohol limit in Utah. This is just what I could find by going through the tedious process of scrolling down through thousands of comments. If I went back further, I could dig up arguments that I have made that alcohol prohibition actually helped significantly lower the levels of alcoholism in the United States. That’s also not counting the many times I have advocated for tighter restrictions on alcohol using my actual name on other forums.

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/mar/24/utah-governor-signs-bill-lowering-blood-alcohol-li/

    Zampona ->Ricocat1
    “Yes, there have been numerous studies on this that show impairment begins at the first drink. The National Transportation Safety Board has been advocating a .05 limit for a number of years based on controlled studies. The rest of the world is at .05. This is safety enabled by puritanism, not puritanism masquerading as safety.”

    http://archive.sltrib.com/article.php?id=5053035&itype=CMSID

    I have too many comments on this thread to quote all of them, but some highlights are:

    “That article doesn’t appear to argue that the numbers are not significant from a statistical perspective, but that the benefits don’t outweigh the burdens. I personally think that having to call an uber when you drink is a small price to pay for a 38 percent reduction in drunk driving fatalities. The numbers for buzzed drivers under the limit is low, but the studies find that lowering the limit reduces the number of people who drive while exceeding .08. I understand disagreeing, but people here are acting like it’s just naked religious persecution, when in fact this move is backed by a scientific studies and recommendations of experts. Most of the world already has the lower limit and drinks much more than Utah, and they have seen only success.”

    “Virtually all people are impaired at .05 and studies have demonstrated that the risk if an accident is 7 to 20 times higher at BAC between .05 and .079”

  28. Well Zampona,

    My hats off to you this time! You are the very first person opposing medical marijuana that was able to provide proof that you are not actually a hypocrite by demonstrating that you have expressed at least equal if nor far greater online concern over alcohol in the past as well….

    Thank you for taking the time to prove it.

    You are not a hypocrite and are entitled to your opinions.

    Respect earned.

  29. I was thinking the exact same thing but really, you can’t reason with a bonghead as they don’t have the mental capacity anymore.

  30. Why is this church attempting to use the government to impose its religious belief on others? Religion should not dictate public policy. Scientific studies of marijuana should be the chief consideration.

  31. If marijuana were good enough for George Washington surely it was the original intent of the Founding Fathers to allow the use of marijuana, and therefore all good Mormon Republicans should support its legalization.

  32. No, not at all.

    I’m very impressed that you took the time to show that you really do care equally about alcohol and prescription medications and have made comments about them online also.

    As I said, in all the years I’ve posed that question to those who are anti-marijuana, they were all hypocrites and never could prove otherwise.

    I’ve got much more respect for you now and thank you.

  33. Thanks for being part of the blue line Ben. What’d you do?

  34. George Washington also owned a ton of slaves. I don’t think he sets a good example for what should be legal.

  35. It’s a hallucinogen that dements brains. Medicinally it has reasons to be used, but recreationally it is a crutch and burden. Like alcohol.

  36. Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, aka Mormons, do not drink alcohol recreationally. It’s not good for you.

  37. “Recreational use” is a normative term. Some people use it medicinally so they can function in a recreational setting… I think the point should be “no abuse” of the drug; but then again, what is “abuse”? Thank goodness for personal revelation!

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