RNS Daily Digest

c. 2003 Religion News Service Survey: 41 Percent of Adults Worship at Small Churches (RNS) Despite the attention on the nation’s largest churches, 41 percent of churchgoing adults worship at churches with 100 or fewer adults in attendance on an average weekend, a Barna Research Group survey shows. In comparison, only 12 percent of churchgoing adults are found on the average weekend in churches where there are 1,000 or more adults in attendance. The Ventura, Calif.-based research firm found that the smallest churches (average weekend attendance of 100 or fewer adults) are more likely than either mid-sized (301-999 adults) or large churches (1,000 or more adults) to attract people who are not college graduates and are more likely to interest people with lower household incomes. Researchers also found that adults younger than 35 are more likely than older adults to worship in small churches.

RNS Daily Digest

c. 2003 Religion News Service Survey: 41 Percent of Adults Worship at Small Churches (RNS) Despite the attention on the nation’s largest churches, 41 percent of churchgoing adults worship at churches with 100 or fewer adults in attendance on an average weekend, a Barna Research Group survey shows. In comparison, only 12 percent of churchgoing adults are found on the average weekend in churches where there are 1,000 or more adults in attendance. The Ventura, Calif.-based research firm found that the smallest churches (average weekend attendance of 100 or fewer adults) are more likely than either mid-sized (301-999 adults) or large churches (1,000 or more adults) to attract people who are not college graduates and are more likely to interest people with lower household incomes. Researchers also found that adults younger than 35 are more likely than older adults to worship in small churches.

NEWS DIGEST: Religion in Canada

c. 2003 Religion News Service Canadian Missionary Freed in Lebanon (UNDATED) A Canadian missionary jailed in Lebanon July 10 was acquitted of spying for Israel on Monday (Sept. 1). A Lebanese military court found Bruce Balfour, 52, a Christian missionary from Calgary, not guilty of collaborating with Israel, a charge punishable by 15 years in jail. Judicial sources said he was accused of working with the Jewish state to spy on Lebanon’s army and its Shiite Hezbollah militia.

NEWS DIGEST: Religion in Canada

c. 2003 Religion News Service Canadian Missionary Freed in Lebanon (UNDATED) A Canadian missionary jailed in Lebanon July 10 was acquitted of spying for Israel on Monday (Sept. 1). A Lebanese military court found Bruce Balfour, 52, a Christian missionary from Calgary, not guilty of collaborating with Israel, a charge punishable by 15 years in jail. Judicial sources said he was accused of working with the Jewish state to spy on Lebanon’s army and its Shiite Hezbollah militia.

COMMENTARY: Finding a Teachable Moment in the Ten Commandments

c. 2003 Religion News Service (The Rev. C. Welton Gaddy is president of The Interfaith Alliance, a nonpartisan, clergy-led, grass-roots organization that promotes compassion, civility and mutual respect for human dignity. Gaddy is also pastor for preaching and worship at Northminster (Baptist) Church in Monroe, La.) (UNDATED) The removal of the two-ton Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building in Alabama should not be described as a “win” or a “loss” for anybody. This whole divisive spectacle has enflamed a debate that likely will continue to divide the nation. Individuals on both sides of the issue share a passion for strengthening our nation and, thus, deserve respect for their points of view.

COMMENTARY: Finding a Teachable Moment in the Ten Commandments

c. 2003 Religion News Service (The Rev. C. Welton Gaddy is president of The Interfaith Alliance, a nonpartisan, clergy-led, grass-roots organization that promotes compassion, civility and mutual respect for human dignity. Gaddy is also pastor for preaching and worship at Northminster (Baptist) Church in Monroe, La.) (UNDATED) The removal of the two-ton Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building in Alabama should not be described as a “win” or a “loss” for anybody. This whole divisive spectacle has enflamed a debate that likely will continue to divide the nation. Individuals on both sides of the issue share a passion for strengthening our nation and, thus, deserve respect for their points of view.