Republicans hope to find ‘missing’ evangelical voters

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Ten Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidates, (L-R) New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, Dr. Ben Carson, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, businessman Donald Trump, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, U.S. Senator Rand Paul and Ohio Governor John Kasich, debate at the first official Republican presidential candidates debate of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign in Cleveland, Ohio, August 6, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Brian Snyder
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-GOP-DEBATE, originally transmitted on Jan. 14, 2016.

Ten Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidates, (L-R) New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, Dr. Ben Carson, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, businessman Donald Trump, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, U.S. Senator Rand Paul and Ohio Governor John Kasich, debate at the first official Republican presidential candidates debate of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign in Cleveland, Ohio, August 6, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Brian Snyder *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-GOP-DEBATE, originally transmitted on Jan. 14, 2016.

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Estimates suggest there were as many as 17 million "missing" evangelical voters in 2012, but some political analysts question whether the potential number is that high.

  • larry

    Trump is the only GOP candidate with more than half a brain here.

    Rather than scrape for a few points worth of evangelical voters, who are being split among 3-5 candidates (depending on how they treat Bush the Least and the level of racism working against Carson), Trump is courting a different group altogether. Nativists and Libertarian yahoos.

  • Jack

    The idiocy of these so-called evangelicals is staggering. The problems America faces are largely the problems created by the fundie Republicans they themselves voted in. We don’t have too few so-called evangelicals voting – we have far, FAR too many.

  • Mike

    I wrote a piece on this a while back, localizing it to Florida and the Fourth Judicial Circuit (Angela Corey) and one of my sources was from Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty. Rest assured, the NAE is only rethinking its position because of politically-driven change in the wake of realizing it costs more money to keep inmates on death row and go through the appeals process than it does to issue them life sentences.

  • Mary B

    I’ve heard more than one “evangelical” state that voting for “the lesser of two evils” is still voting for evil, so they vote for none.

  • George Nixon Shuler

    A large portion of those attracted to right-wing religion have never voted, and the conversion to these sects is seldom permanent but usually followed by withdrawal and disillusionment, as these poor schlubs have been taken for suckers once again in their so far miserable lives. Sooner or later a lot of folks realize they’ve been taken and move on. Of course, in places like Alabama and Kansas, they ought to be able to establish polling places in the church and the deacons could just march ’em down to the fellowship hall where the local equivalent of Kim Davis has set up shop and get that vote while they got the mark in their clutches. One-stop shopping, exploitation-wise, if you will.

  • Rickster

    3 possibilities for these missing voters: 1) they died 2) they were raptured 3) they’re a figment of wishful thinking – I’m going with number 3.

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  • dzerres

    I find it hard to believe 17 million religious nuts didn’t vote last time out. How then did we get all of those kooky House Republicans if all of these folks stayed home? More delusion from the people who are most delusional in this country.

  • George Nixon Shuler

    dzerres, my impression is very much of what is called “conservatism,” whether political or religious, is based on the falsehood “we are the majority; most people agree with us.” A large number of their arguments are bandwagon fallacies. It’s sad.

  • Bill N

    What is the definition of “evangelical voter” and who or what created that definition?