Bread for the World puts price tag on hunger: $160 billion in health care

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Workers fill carts with food for the poor at the Foothill Unity Center food bank in Monrovia, California, on November 14, 2012. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/David McNew
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-HUNGER-POVERTY, originally transmitted on Nov. 23, 2015.

Workers fill carts with food for the poor at the Foothill Unity Center food bank in Monrovia, California, on November 14, 2012. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/David McNew *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-HUNGER-POVERTY, originally transmitted on Nov. 23, 2015.

WASHINGTON (RNS) Hunger and food insecurity are so widespread in the United States they add $160 billion to national health care spending, according to a Christian advocacy group.

The Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, said on Monday (Nov. 23) that hunger was a key factor in the U.S. having the worst infant mortality rate among developed countries.

“It is like a massive terrorist attack,” he said at the presentation of the group’s annual Hunger Report. “All the things that we do that allow the infant mortality rate to be so high — that is in effect killing a hundred thousand babies in communities across this country a year.”

The report, titled “The Nourishing Effect: Ending Hunger, Improving Health, Reducing Inequality,” notes that the U.S. also ranks at or near the bottom for other indicators such as obesity, lack of access to food and maternal mortality.

The report says that as many as 50 million people — approximately 1 in 6 Americans — live in a state of sustained hunger or food insecurity, defined as not having adequate access to food to keep them healthy. It says the figure has remained “stubbornly high” at the same level since 2008, despite the recovering economy.

A panel of health and hunger experts spoke at an event releasing Bread for the World’s annual hunger report on Nov. 23, 2015 at the National Press Club. Religion News Service photo by Adelle M. Banks

A panel of health and hunger experts spoke at an event releasing Bread for the World’s annual hunger report on Nov. 23, 2015 at the National Press Club. Religion News Service photo by Adelle M. Banks


MORE: Hunger in America: 1 in 7 rely on food banks


John T. Cook, an associate professor of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine, who helped prepare the report, said the figure of $160 billion in health care costs is “probably an underestimate.”

But doctors are increasingly recognizing the connection between health and hunger, experts said.

Acacia Bamberg Salatti of the Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said hospitals are partnering with church groups to help patients translate their doctor’s instructions and connect them to healthy meals.

“At the end of the day, health care and hunger are very much linked,” she said. “You can’t be healthy, you can’t be able to stave off chronic diseases if you’re not eating healthy food.”

Dr. Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg of the American Academy of Pediatrics said there should be as much attention given to the economic and human costs of food insecurity as to a comparable breakout in infectious disease.

“I think the fact that we can’t see it makes it very hard for people to deal with it,” she said.

JS/MG END BANKS

  • Bernardo

    Well Mr. Beckham and his minions will not go hungry. For example, Mr. Beckham gets paid ~$400,000 a year and even though his “non-profits” collect over $24 million/yr. in donations, I don’t see any of it going for food. Lots of lobbying and lots of reports though.

  • Bernardo

    From guidestar.org (Form 990’s)

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  • Stephen

    Bernardo Bread for the World makes it clear that it is NOT a direct service organization. It does not provide food for people. It’s very mission is to effect change at the policy level. Government provides 19 of the 20 bags of groceries that feed hungry people in the U.S. There needs to be lobbying. Also, it’s spelled Beckmann.

  • Bernardo

    Oops, sorry about that, make that Mr. Beckmann. And instead of donating to this “nothing but bureaucratic non-profit”, donate to groups like the Red Cross or Meals on Wheels where your donation actually buys food for the less fortunate. And one does wonder where they get this $160 billion cost in health care? Sounds like over-estimation to increase their dwindling donation base.

  • Wendy

    This is a hugely important, the idea that hunger and the lack of good food choices impacts our medical costs. That said, $400,000 a year for the head of a non-profit is a absurd. I bet a retired business executive would do the work for half the money — or a quarter.

  • Jim

    Go to Bread’s website and read the report. The research is carefully spelled out that concluded there is a health care cost of $160 billion from hunger in America. Also, Bernardo, you grossly overstate his salary. It is wonderful that you donate to Meals on Wheels and the Red Cross.

  • Jim

    Wendy, A great many non-profit executives make $400,000 and more. Five years ago, the Chronicle of Philanthropy reported: “From an Charity Navigator’s database of more than 5,500 nonprofits—including most of the leading ones—shows that only 291 (less than one half of 1 percent) reported total compensation over $400,000 on their most recent IRS 990 form.” Rev. Beckmann is not one of them. If he still worked at the World Bank, where he was before he took a dramatic cut in pay to work at Bread for the World, he may very well have been making more than $400,000 a year.

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