Boston Marathon victim’s parents: ‘Drop the death penalty’

Print More
Jane Richard, the sister of Boston Marathon bombing victim Martin Richard, tries on a firefighters's helmet during a visit to the fire station on Boylston Street on the second anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings in Boston. With her are her father Bill (left) and mother Denise (right).  Photo by REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Jane Richard, the sister of Boston Marathon bombing victim Martin Richard, tries on a firefighters's helmet during a visit to the fire station on Boylston Street on the second anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings in Boston. With her are her father Bill (left) and mother Denise (right). Photo by REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Active RNS subscribers and members can view this content by logging-in here.

BOSTON (Reuters) "We know that the government has its reasons for seeking the death penalty, but the continued pursuit of that punishment could bring years of appeals and prolong reliving the most painful day of our lives," Bill and Denise Richard said.

  • Pingback: Parents of young Boston Marathon victim say ‘drop the death penalty’ - by Fr. Ron Gronowski - Rev Ron Gronowski - The Reverend()

  • Jim Bob

    Martin’s legacy is that of peace. Martin will always be remembered for his beautiful smile with him holding up that message calling for peace — an image etched in our memories!

  • And if other survivors endorse the government’s efforts toward a capital sentence, will that be reported in Kevin Eckstrom’s Gay News?

    Victimization is not coterminous with virtue or prudence. You’ve got four murders and a mess of people maimed. He cannot complain if he’s put in front of a firing squad in Copley Square.

  • Jazziscoolithink

    What would be the virtuous thing to do then? Murder the murderer to teach that murder is wrong. Retributive justice is unworkable and defeats its supposed purpose.

  • Greg

    Yes that is the problem. The idea of life in prison is it gives the person a chance to repent, so he doesn’t end up in hell for all eternity.The main thing is he is out of society for the rest of his life. The only thing the death penalty does is ward off future attacks like this one; that would be the State’s position.

  • The word ‘murder’ does not mean what you think it is.

    The exercise of capital punishment has Biblical warrant and its legitimacy was never questioned until the day before yesterday. See the writings of Avery Cardinal Dulles.

    The notion that it ‘doesn’t work’ requires redefining aims so that no one would recognize them, ignoring social research on the topic, or lying.

  • He’ll have a chance to repent while awaiting execution. The har-de-har public interest bar manages to drag out appeals for a median of about nine years after sentencing.

  • Fran

    Martin has the marvelous hope of a resurrection back to life on earth, to be reunited with family and friends (John 5:28,29; Acts 24:15), along with other persons who lost their lives at that terrible event.

    Resurrections will take place on earth during the upcoming millennial and messianic rule of God’s kingdom or heavenly government, which we can be so grateful for. And Jane can look forward to regaining a leg which she lost as well.