Comments

  1. Today’s racism for the day;
    “Harold Koenig, one of the foremost experts on religion and health, and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke University, said the correlation is particularly true in the U.S. among African-Americans and ethnic groups…..Religious people, he said, “are encouraged to eat. And the kinds of meals people eat in church fellowship groups are high-calorie ribs and fried chicken.”

  2. Religions have served many purposes over the centuries. One of which has been to build a sense of community among like minded followers so that they can live in some sort of harmony for the benefit of those in their group. THIS however also has a negative side, can lead to the “Us” versus “Them” fear and hate of the “other” those that aren’t like us that is and has torn our world apart.

    I have pointed out to many Atheists that IF they want to get rid of religion they will have to offer a better alternative that meets the needs of the people. This sense of belonging to a group is the greatest need.

    That aside I wonder if the survey compared happiness ratings with Atheists that are involved with community groups? That would be what would give us a clearer picture of what is going on here. If Atheists active in community groups are as happy or happier than their active religious counterparts is what waits to be determined.

  3. Apparently Harold Koenig is an insensitive, not to mention biased, git.

  4. Well, they could volunteer an atheist charity; a hospice, a hospital, a daycare center, something along those lines.

    Now, IF there were any it would be a lot easier.

  5. Multiple studies also show that those who practice a religion live longer.

    Does that indicate that “fat” is another Yonat Shimron spin, substituting for some less loaded terminology?

  6. Except they would still miss the cohesiveness of the Holy Spirit who unites Christians

  7. Their biggest problem seems to be the non-existence of their charities.

    It’s a lot cheaper to carp at religious people than to reach in their pockets and spend money on others.

  8. The studies DO NOT make a blanket claim that world-wide religious folks live longer than those who don’t practice a religious faith.

    Some of the countries with the shortest expected lifespans are highly religious. It differs country to country. Sweden has a life expectancy of about 80, but has mostly a non-religious, agnostic population.

  9. Link. You make claims but never supply links unless it’s a Bible verse. I shouldn’t have to do your homework to see if you are telling the truth. If you found such a claim, share the link as well as making a statement.

  10. http://www{DOT}time.com/5159848/do-religious-people-live-longer/

    https://www{DOT}independent.co.uk/news/health/religion-live-longer-muslim-jewish-christian-hindu-buddhist-life-expectancy-age-a8396866.html

    https://www{DOT}ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3035005/

    https://www{DOT}washingtontimes.com/news/2018/jun/14/religious-people-longer-lifespans-atheists-study/

    https://www{DOT}psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-human-beast/201302/do-religious-people-really-live-longer

    If you happen to find a study comparing religious Swedes’ life expectancy with irreligious Swedes’, we can pick this back up.

  11. Your links are about the US, not the world. Two are about the same US study. The Psych Today article backs my statement, it depends which country is studies.

    What does it all mean?
    When we compare people living in the same country, religious people enjoy a health advantage if they are part of a large majority, as is true of the U.S. That advantage disappears if religious people are in the minority.

  12. No, the data in the Psychology Today article supports my conclusions. I included it because the author – and it surprises me – makes the same mistake you do. In fact, it appeared to be the source of your comment.

    “Countries with very low life expectancy are mostly very religious.”

    Interesting but irrelevant. How does the life expectancy of religious people in the country with very low life expectancy compare the life expectancy of irreligious people in the country with very low life expectancy?

    Remember, when we analyze with statistics we keep everything constant (as far as possible) except the variable.

    “This means that developed countries are both healthier and more secular.”

    And here an example of the error – the fact that developed countries are both healthier and more secular measures two variables – wealth and religion. But we’re not interested in the effects of wealth on longevity.

    I am rather surprised that a profession – psychology – whose premises and procedures such as evaluations depend so much on statistics consistently misuses and misinterprets them.

    No wonder the profession is having a replication crisis.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/11/psychologys-replication-crisis-real/576223/

  13. There’s plenty of Atheist and otherwise secular/non-religious charities. You’re just ignorant.

  14. ♫ What goes up, must come down
    Spinning wheel got to go round
    Talkin’ ’bout your troubles, it’s a cryin’ sin
    Ride a painted pony, let the spinning wheel spin ♫

  15. Given the fact that you walked into a trap a child should have seen coming, singing a song may be your very best exit.

  16. You’ve changed the topic.

    Secular/non-religious charities are not the same thing as atheist charities.

    Spend a few minutes and provide the name and location of an atheist charity hospital or hospice.

    Wow us.

  17. You have every opportunity to explain how a valid statistical evaluation can be made moving two variables simultaneously.

    Here are some refreshers to help you:

    http://onlinestatbook.com/

    https://www{DOT}edx.org/learn/statistics

    If you can pull that one off, we’ll the replication problem in your profession slide.

  18. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4173112/?fbclid=IwAR3I9qs-NJYyWhtuvAXn4gehdGoBPS-AzZM8efJoti-LDSk6n_qQp5GIpts

    Religious delusions are common and are considered to be particularly difficult to treat.

    ——

    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/cogs.12138

    ”…exposure to religious ideas has a powerful impact on children’s differentiation between reality and fiction, not just for religious stories but also for fantastical stories.”

    Keep the Lies about gods away from children!

  19. Religions are social groups, and it is this concept of being in a supportive social group which creates the ‘longer lives’ …. not the ‘religions’ per se, in and of themselves…!!

    [btw – there are no gods…!!!]
    !!!

  20. Did you pull off the evidence to prove your gods yet??~!!!

  21. You just wowed us with a comment soooo stupid…..!!!:
    ”Secular/non-religious charities are not the same thing as atheist charities.”

  22. Religion is best when one is not attached to a group. One of the things you can do when not obligated to attend some church you supposedly “belong to” is visit others. Another thing you can do is select the doctrine you want rather than the one some group says is the only one you can have in their four walls. Another thing you can do skip being involved in any conflicts with other church people about doctrine, politics, church administration, retention of pastor, redecorating or events. Another thing you can do is get free of any church cliques or rumor circles which are critical of any other persons in the church. Another thing you can do is not mislead your children about how much better one church is than another.

    My wife and I have been out of churches for 25 years, but not cut off from Jesus at all. We never knew how much we would appreciate being out of the hassle loops until we were out of them. The best way to get free, of course, is to move to another town, which we happened to do three times in life for other reasons. If that is not realistic, it’s more complicated because leaving any church where people actually know you is a hard thing to do. It’s nearly impossible to tell people anything about why you’re stopping without sounding critical or hurting someone’s feelings—–which is NOT the goal. The goal is to not have some “fellowship” dominating any part of your life with negative consequences.

  23. And YOU just wowed us with a comment soooo stupid…..!!!:

    You really have nothing intelligent to add to the conversation, do you?

  24. Religion is known to add weight to our thoughts, words, deeds and even to our bodily appearances. Out here our monks, swamis, bishops, religious superiors representing different genders come across as healthier, weightier, cheerful and always smiling as compared to other fellow-mortals not involved or less involved in chanting, singing, and praying. Alert to the sound of the bell or the gong, with religious determination they move in procession towards the prayer hall to re-charge their spiritual batteries or to the dining hall to accomplish their duties before blissfully retiring to their cells.

  25. Religion is best when one is not attached to a group. One of the things you can do when not obligated to attend some church you supposedly “belong to” is visit others. Another thing you can do is select the doctrine you want rather than the one some group says is the only one you can have in their four walls. Another thing you can do is skip being involved in any conflicts with other church people about doctrine, politics, church administration, retention of pastor, redecorating or events. Another thing you can do is get free of any church cliques or rumor circles which are critical of any other persons in the church. Another thing you can do is not mislead your children about how much better one church is than another.

    My wife and I have been out of churches for 25 years, but not cut off from Jesus at all. We never knew how much we would appreciate being out of the hassle loops until we were out of them. The best way to get free, of course, is to move to another town, which we happened to do four times in life for other reasons. If that is not realistic, it’s more complicated because leaving any church where people actually know you is a hard thing to do. It’s nearly impossible to tell people anything about why you’re stopping without sounding critical or hurting someone’s feelings—–which is NOT the goal. The goal is to not have some “fellowship” dominating any part of your life with negative consequences

  26. People who belong to supportive communities (religious and other) tend to be happier. It’s likely they also socialize more over food. That doesn’t strike me as a brilliant revelation, just common sense.

    Honestly, I’m not finding much value in this article.

  27. Secular and non-religious charities are effectively atheist.

  28. and you cannot prove your gods – (especially obvious with your deflections…)

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