How Trump resembles many popular evangelical preachers (COMMENTARY)

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Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks with his daughter Ivanka, left, and his wife Melania, right, at his sides at his 2016 South Carolina presidential primary night victory rally in Spartanburg, South Carolina February 20, 2016. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-GUSHEE-COLUMN, originally transmitted on March 10, 2016.

Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks with his daughter Ivanka, left, and his wife Melania, right, at his sides at his 2016 South Carolina presidential primary night victory rally in Spartanburg, South Carolina February 20, 2016. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-GUSHEE-COLUMN, originally transmitted on March 10, 2016.

(RNS) Many observers are wondering how exactly Donald Trump is winning so much “evangelical” Christian support.

Leaving aside definitional quibbles about the meaning of the term “evangelical,” why is this uber-worldly candidate doing so well among this segment of voters?

I found my answer while watching Trump’s bizarre QVC/Trump Steak/Trump Vodka/Trump Doral news conference after his victories Tuesday (March 8).


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My thesis: They like him just as they like the “evangelical” preachers that he resembles. They like him because he connects with the religious and cultural trends that these preachers represent:

1. Donald Trump resembles health-and-wealth, prosperity gospel preachers like Creflo Dollar.

This version of Christianity proclaims that Jesus intends his true followers to be healthy, wealthy and successful. The preacher in such churches models the message by personally overflowing with health, wealth and success. “You too can be like me if you believe like me — and if you support me.” Trump offers a kind of national prosperity gospel to a people he diagnoses as hungry for such a message.

2.Trump resembles Andy Stanley, Rick Warren and Bill Hybels, who create and lead branded, multisite, personality-driven megachurches or church networks.

Trump reminds me of these pastors in their independence, fearlessness and enormous skill at creating and marketing a brand around themselves and their vision. Trump is himself a brand creator who does not answer to anyone. He has been cultivating and advancing his brand for decades.

Billy Graham speaks at Legion Field in Birmingham, Ala., in 1964. Religion News Service file photo

Billy Graham speaks at Legion Field in Birmingham, Ala., in 1964. Religion News Service file photo

3. Trump resembles preacher-evangelist-showmen of various eras, like Billy Sunday and Billy Graham.

His rallies are more like football games than lectures or policy talks. In this he resembles every evangelist who has managed to create a worship experience that by the standards of the time is dazzling, inspiring and fun, a great show with the coolest music and a thrilling central personality.

4. Trump resembles the attributes of evangelical pastor Mark Driscoll: authoritative, hyper-macho and prone to say something off-color or politically incorrect.

The authentic, uncensored, swearing Christian leader is in now, and they are not all male — consider the popularity of Denver’s Nadia Bolz-Weber. This may help explain why someone like Trump can outmuscle the more puritanical and pious Sen. Ted Cruz. The younger crowd is especially receptive to, and maybe even attracted by, a few obscenities.

Without naming more preachers, I can say that Trump appeals to an anti-intellectual and anti-elite strand of American Christian life. He seems to be a straight talker who doesn’t even bother to write speeches. In this way he resembles many preachers who do not write sermons but simply “speak from the heart.” I notice, by the way, that people who do not have significant academic training write and publish a greater number of books on religion. Celebrity authors now outdo scholars of religion — maybe like celebrity candidates now trounce experienced government leaders.

Mark Driscoll was an influential but edgy pastor within conservative evangelical circles for several years. Photo courtesy of Mars Hill Church

Mark Driscoll was an influential but edgy pastor within conservative evangelical circles for several years. Photo courtesy of Mars Hill Church


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It may be precisely because Trump hasn’t gone to Harvard Law School — and doesn’t know what the nuclear triad is — hasn’t been a governor, and doesn’t speak in a modulated NPR voice, that he appeals to those who are tired of being told what to think by college professors and experts. Every time he pulverizes one of these elite figures, he wins points.

The dominant, take-charge, charismatic male pastor figure (usually accompanied by the requisite beautiful wife) is a staple in many Christian traditions, and there is no question that Trump connects to many at that level.

David Gushee is distinguished university professor of Christian ethics and director of the Center for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University. He writes the Christians, Conflict and Change blog for RNS. Photo courtesy of David Gushee

David Gushee is Distinguished University Professor of Christian Ethics and director of the Center for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University. He writes the Christians, Conflict and Change blog for RNS. Photo courtesy of David Gushee

Strength. Charisma. Manliness. Independence. Toughness. Celebrity. Prosperity. Power. Success. Personality. Showmanship. Like many of today’s most successful preachers, this is what Trump projects. It looks like he will win the Republican nomination with it.

The fact that he has demonstrated the kind of temperament that should have immediately disqualified him from consideration for the presidency is, of course, not a small problem.

(David Gushee is Distinguished University Professor of Christian Ethics and director of the Center for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University. He writes for RNS at Christians, Conflict and Change)

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  • Scott Shaver

    One gets the impression from Mr Gushee that the only “acceptable” form of “Christianity” is that practiced by the “elite” and “intellectual”.

    Guess Jesus forgot to tell that to the masses. Will be sure to write those qualifiers into the margin of John 3:16 as a reminder.

  • Sabelotodo2

    Evangelicals made a grave mistake back in the 70’s-80’s, following Jerry Falwell into the political realm and promoting politics as the path to God’s kingdom here on earth. I agree with Gushee’s analysis here: Trump is the empty shell that remains. It’s anouther affirmation that Christians should get out of the nasty business of politics, and instead, focus on “being Christ to the world.”

  • Scott Shaver

    Proof-texing is a “fools game” in these kinds of discussion Dyna.

    Read Romans 3. Did Noah get drunk after the flood among other indisgressions. Did Peter lie before the cross and exercise racism after the resurrection? Did he resort to violence in the garden.

    Get real.

    These self-righteous Eutopian declarations of what Christians are and aren’t are purely political in this season of elections. You’ve obviously been drinking the same ERLC kool-aid as a lot of Southern Baptists.

  • Scott Shaver

    Or, perhaps Christians should get of the business of listening to bitter academicians as to the extent and quality of their faith.

    There’s a better “teacher” called alongside to help.

  • Jack

    Sven, you sound like you’re the fraud, since you’re passing yourself off as an expert on “their god,” presumably meaning the God of the Bible. It’s obvious from your remark that you haven’t done any rigorous study on the subject.

  • Tom

    Actually Trump reminds me of a reality TV show host. To be honest ,my favorite “politician evangelist” is Hillary ,when she gets that Southern Black Baptist thing going. ” I ain’t no where’s tired, I Came too far from where I started from,nobody told me the road would be easy…..

  • Sven Patrick

    What Trump and evangelical preachers have in common is that they are frauds, just as their bible is.

  • kerry

    Trump resembles the fundamentalist God as much as he resembles fundamentalist preachers.

  • Rachel Woodall

    I am thinking that Donald Trump has contributed a lot of money to these churches. Joel Osteen said he was a good man and was a “friend” of the ministry so to me that sounds like he has donated money.