After uproar, German town warms to refugees who took over church

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Members of a migrant Syrian family, Zabyl Olabi (C), her husband Mahmod and their 18-year-old son Humam (L), who came from Haleb near Aleppo, pose inside a Protestant church in Oberhausen, Germany November 19, 2015. Up to 140 refugees are landing in Oberhausen every week, forcing authorities to come up with new locations to house them. City officials say they had little choice but to use the church. In early November, workers removed the altar and dozens of chairs, replacing them with metal beds, which are separated by makeshift partitions to give the church's new residents a semblance of privacy. Picture taken November 19, 2015. To match story EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GERMANY-CHURCH     REUTERS/Ina Fassbender - RTX1VX13

Members of a migrant Syrian family, Zabyl Olabi (C), her husband Mahmod and their 18-year-old son Humam (L), who came from Haleb near Aleppo, pose inside a Protestant church in Oberhausen, Germany November 19, 2015. Up to 140 refugees are landing in Oberhausen every week, forcing authorities to come up with new locations to house them. City officials say they had little choice but to use the church. In early November, workers removed the altar and dozens of chairs, replacing them with metal beds, which are separated by makeshift partitions to give the church's new residents a semblance of privacy. Picture taken November 19, 2015. To match story EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GERMANY-CHURCH REUTERS/Ina Fassbender - RTX1VX13

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When news of the plan to house 50 refugees in the church and suspend Sunday services spread through the town, angry residents pressed church and city officials to reconsider. But nearly a month on, the uproar has died down and residents are beginning to warm to the refugees.