10 faith facts about GOP front-runners in Fox News’ main debate

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Ten Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidates, (L-R) New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, Dr. Ben Carson, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, businessman Donald Trump, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, U.S. Senator Rand Paul and Ohio Governor John Kasich, debate at the first official Republican presidential candidates debate of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign in Cleveland, Ohio, August 6, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Brian Snyder
*Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-GOP-DEBATE, originally transmitted on Jan. 14, 2016.

Ten Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidates, (L-R) New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, Dr. Ben Carson, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, businessman Donald Trump, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, U.S. Senator Rand Paul and Ohio Governor John Kasich, debate at the first official Republican presidential candidates debate of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign in Cleveland, Ohio, August 6, 2015. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Brian Snyder *Editors: This photo may only be republished with RNS-GOP-DEBATE, originally transmitted on Jan. 14, 2016.

(RNS) Many of the top 10 Republican presidential contenders gave God a nod during the Fox News televised 2016 election debate Thursday (Aug.6).

The concluding question asked about how God might give them a word on how to deal in the Oval Office if elected.

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said, “I’m blessed to receive a word form God every day” through the Bible.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker said God doesn’t give him a Do List but he “calls me to live by his will.”

Ohio Gov. John Kasich believes the Lord wants America “to succeed and to lead.”

But Florida Senator Marco Rubio has a zinger for his benedictory comment: “God has blessed with our party with some very good candidates” — not so the Democrats. 

Earlier in the debated, several wove God into their comments on other questions.

Ben Carson said God is fair about his expectations for tithing so the tax code should be more fair, too. And former Gov. Mike Huckabee, a Baptist pastor, said no court decision could alter his view that personhood begins at conception and all the Constitutional rights that go with it: “The Supreme Court is not the Supreme Being.”

Of course, all the candidates have a background of religious life and remarks. So Religion News Service has created an ongoing series to help you keep track.

In our “5 faith facts” series, RNS highlights the religious background and faith-related remarks for every announced candidate — including the seven GOP folks relegated to the second-tier candidates’ dinner-and-drive-time debate, which precedes the 9 p.m. Eastern main event.

Here — in the order to which Fox News has ranked them — are some of the candidates’ more memorable remarks on faith, drawn from the RNS series:

Real estate magnate Donald Trump:

“I do get sent a lot of Bibles and I like that. I think that’s great.”

Former Fla. Gov. Jeb Bush:

“Irrespective of the Supreme Court ruling … we need to be stalwart supporters of traditional marriage.”

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker:

“I don’t know” whether Obama is a Christian.

Former Arkansas Gov. (and Baptist pastor) Mike Huckabee:

“Spiritual convictions should certainly be reflected in one’s worldview, approaches to problems, and perspective.”

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson:

“Even when I don’t operate, I pray because I feel that God is the ultimate source of all wisdom.”

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz:

“We can turn our country around, but only if the body of Christ rises up.”

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio:

“Faith in our Creator is the most important American value of all.”

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul:

“I am a Christian but not always a good one.”

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie:

“No rights are given to you by government. All our rights are given to you by God.”

Ohio Gov. John Kasich:

“God is with me wherever I happen to be.”

In case you think any of the candidates that Fox News consigned to the minor leagues will break out of the pack, here are links to the five faith facts on:

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, former HP head Carly Fiorina, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, former New York Gov. George Pataki and former Virginia Gov. Jim Gilmore.

YS/MG END GROSSMAN

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  • Rionni

    These politicans need to read the Bible cause gettin drunk,gambling and
    gossip,being mean/ sharp tongues,premartial sex/sleeping around are all
    sins along with takin the Lords name in vain,coveting/jealousy,greed plus
    if you say you are going to do something you should follow through on it.
    Bible says Repent and believe the Gospel to be saved! We must Repent!

  • steve

    Wow. I wouldn’t vote for any of these cowards. Putting faith in sky fairies to get power. How gullible are you? So America is doomed unless Zombie Jesus comes to save it….LMAO!! This from an Ivy Leaguer?? ROFL!!

  • Fran

    They are more “earthly political” than “spiritually theocratic” or supporting God’s kingdom or heavenly government (Daniel 2:44) as the only hope of government for man (Isaiah 11:1-9), as Jesus, his Son did.

    They each think they can solve “all” of man’s problems, when only God can and will in the near future, because of His perfect love for man as well as power, which imperfect man greatly lacks.

  • Bernardo

    But there is no god so now what? Acting like rational human beings would be a start.

  • Bernardo

    And all borrowed from the Egyptian Book of the Dead. All hail the Egyptians!! Added details are available.

  • Be Brave

    That atheism is taken seriously by anyone just shows that the insane can actually speak like they are sane. Anyone that REALLY thinks that everything can come from nothing is nuts.

    Be that reality as it may, Walker is as much Christian as an atheist is. He would crush the life out of a family as easy as an atheist scientist can invent a weapon of mass destruction and blame others for its use.

    .

  • steve

    so unless you’re a believer you’re insane?
    oh, and the paradox you face with your argument is that if everything NEEDED to come from something….from whence came God?
    Atheism is the ONLY rational choice.

  • Bernardo

    Think infinity and recycling with the Big Bang expansion followed by the shrinking reversal called the Gib Gnab and recycling back to the Big Bang repeating the process on and on forever. Human life and Earth are simply a minute part of this chaotic, stochastic, expanding, shrinking process disappearing in five billion years with the burn out of the Sun and maybe returning in another five billion years with different life forms but still subject to the vagaries of its local star.

  • Bernardo

    But Hillary believes in the same Zombie Jesus, so now what?

  • The Great God Pan

    Here’s a better Faith Fact about Ben Carson:

    When asked whether it is the US Constitution or the Bible that holds authority in terms of US law, he responded that it’s “not a simple question” and indicated that some portions of the Bible may override some clauses in the Constitution.

  • steve

    P.S.
    Ever wonder why there are zero openly agnostic/atheist members of congress even though 20% of Americans have no religious affiliation and 7% admit to being atheist/agnostic?
    Honest politicians lol….say anything to get elected.

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  • Jack

    Only someone who is not an Ivy Leaguer would say that no Ivy Leaguer believes in God or seeks to follow His will.

    BTW, Steve, you sound suspiciously like another tub thumper on these boards.

  • Jack

    Careful, Bernardo….Human beings who are consistently rational don’t believe that the whole universe, with its wondrous complexity, came into being all by its lonesome. Such blind faith is more magical than believing that the car you’re driving did likewise.

  • Jack

    Steve, if you could prove that the universe or matter were eternal, that would be one thing. But you can’t, because neither is.

  • john

    That’s because u r a loser anti god liberal

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